Cover

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Half Title, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Table of Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Editors’ Foreword

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pp. ix-x

To most of the fifty-five delegates to the Constitutional Convention of 1787, the absence of any limit on the number of terms a president could serve was an important feature of the new plan of government they were creating. Unrestricted eligibility for reelection would allow the nation to keep a good executive in office ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xii

I have depended in many ways on the help and efforts of others in writing this book, and I have incurred debts that I cannot repay but can at least gratefully acknowledge. I thank Fred M. Woodward, former director of the University Press of Kansas, and the series editors, Michael Nelson and John McCardell, for inviting me to write this book. ...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-5

“Wow!” exclaimed Franklin D. Roosevelt on election night 1936 as his huge margin in New Haven, Connecticut, gave an early indication of the unprecedented size and scope of his reelection victory. In one of the great landslides in American political history, Roosevelt won 60.8 percent of the popular vote to Republican nominee Alfred E. Landon’s 36.5 percent. ...

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1. Roosevelt and the Democrats in the 1930s: Triumph and Troubles

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pp. 6-38

From 1930 to 1936, the Democratic Party went from success to success in national and state elections, with its landslide 1936 victory confirming the Democrats’ transformation from the nation’s minority party to its majority party. Roosevelt aimed to expand the New Deal in his second term, but he and his party met unexpected difficulties. ...

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2. The Republicans: "We Want Willkie"

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pp. 39-77

The Republican Party struggled through much of the 1930s under the weight of the Great Depression, the New Deal, and the presidency of Franklin D. Roosevelt. In 1928, Herbert Hoover had won 58.2 percent of the popular vote for president in carrying 40 states and 444 electoral votes; ...

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3. The Democrats: "The Sphinx"

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pp. 78-130

After the Republican convention, attention turned to Franklin D. Roosevelt and the Democrats. There had been keen speculation, especially over the previous year, about the president’s intentions, but Roosevelt, the New Dealer who kept his cards close to his vest, had proved vexingly enigmatic. ...

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4. The Campaign: The Challenger vs. The "Champ"

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pp. 131-165

The presidential election campaign of 1940 was among the most compelling in American history. A novice dark-horse candidate new to his party ran against an incumbent president seeking an unprecedented third term. Officials in Britain, Germany, and around the world keenly monitored the election, with its implications for American foreign policy and the war in Europe. ...

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5. The Election: "Another Great Democratic Victory"

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pp. 166-184

A record number of Americans went to the polls on November 5. By late evening, it was clear that Franklin D. Roosevelt had won his third term in the White House, though by a diminished margin from 1936, and that Democrats had retained strong control of both houses of Congress. ...

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Epilogue

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pp. 185-196

The politics of the rest of the 1940s largely followed patterns of Roosevelt’s second term and the 1940 election. Democrats won the presidential contests of 1944 and 1948, though by decreasing margins, and Republicans did well in the midterm elections, further strengthening the congressional conservative coalition and even winning control of Congress in 1946. ...

Appendix A: Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Address Accepting the Democratic Party Nomination for President, July 19, 1940

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pp. 197-206

Appendix B: 1940 Presidential Election Results

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pp. 207-208

Appendix C: Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Inauguration Speech, January 20, 1941

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pp. 209-212

Notes

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pp. 213-240

Bibliographical Essay

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pp. 241-250

Index

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pp. 251-264

Back Cover

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Photo Gallery

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