Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

No history book is the product of one individual. That is especially true in this case, and this book only adds one more stepping-stone to a path begun by others, notably Felix Patrikeeff, Bruce Elleman, and the late Peter Tang. Research is the heart of history, and a number of people...

A Note on Transliteration

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pp. 1xi-xii

List of Abbreviations

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pp. xiii-xvi

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Introduction

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pp. 1-4

The 1929 Sino-Soviet conflict was a short and bloody war fought over the jointly operated Chinese Eastern Railroad in China’s Northeast between two powers mostly relegated to the dustbin of history, the Republic of China and the Union of Soviet Socialists Republics.1 A modern limited...

Part I. Creating Conflict: The Chinese Eastern Railroad

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1. The Troubled Frontier

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pp. 7-34

Few places in the 1920s captured the public imagination like Manchuria. For outsiders, it appeared to be the ideal land for dreamers, adventurers, and romantics. As Junichi Saga, a Japanese soldier who served on the Korean–Manchurian border in the 1920s, recounted, “There...

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2. The Northeast Evolving: The 1911 Revolution and the Great War

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pp. 35-63

Few realized the gravity of the situation at Wuchang in early October 1911—neither the political powder keg that would soon erupt into revolution nor the role played by the New Army. Since its formation under Yuan, the New Army had become one of China’s most important...

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3. Talks, Wars, and Railroads (1919–1924)

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pp. 64-100

Peace. The word was on the minds of millions as the world’s leaders descended on Paris and the magnificent palace of Versailles in early 1919. Peking was equally optimistic that a new era was dawning. In November 1918, Westel W. Willoughby, the father of American political science...

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4. Warlordism in Decay, CER Troubles, and the Northern Expedition

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pp. 101-126

Expectations that the Second Fengtien–Chihli War would augur a better era were quickly dashed. Given the breadth of the front and the size of the forces engaged, the war was unlike its predecessors. Had it not been for Feng Yu-hsiang’s betrayal, the outcome might have been different...

Part II. Crisis and War

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5. The Rise of Chang Hsueh-liang and the Coming CER Crisis

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pp. 129-149

Japan understood that China’s reunification was at hand after the Ankuochun defeat at Tsinan and on 18 May, Tokyo sent identic notes to Peking and Nanking making it known that it would not allow the fighting to spread into Manchuria. Japanese Kwantung Army staff officers...

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6. The Chinese and Soviety Russian Forces

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pp. 150-176

The Chinese and Soviet militaries, while sharing the commonalities of any army, were distinctive fighting organizations in 1929. The Young Marshal’s army was in a state of transition. Unlike Wu and Sun’s forces, it had survived the 1926–1928 Northern Expedition largely intact, and...

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7. The CER Incident and War

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pp. 177-205

On the evening of Tuesday, 9 July 1929, L. H. Lamb, the British consul in Harbin, sent a transmission to Peiping noting that the Harbin Special District authorities were apparently preparing for trouble with the Soviets over the CER. At 7:00 a.m. on the following day, in a manner that was...

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8. Renewed Talks, Fighting, and Frustration

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pp. 206-224

That Chinese military reinforcements were needed in the Northeast revealed how the events of July and August had ended in a crisis that seemed to be moving beyond the control of Chiang and Chang. The international community had not rallied to China’s side. Even worse...

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9. The Decisive ODVA Offensive

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pp. 225-253

The ODVA campaign developed in August by Blyukher was proceeding but had yet to realize its purpose. Phase 1 (deployment, border raids, and sabotage) had been completed by September and had yielded many positive results. Phase 2 was not yet completed; the larger attacks...

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10. The 1929 Conflict and Interwar Warfare

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pp. 254-278

From a military history standpoint, the 1929 Sino-Soviet conflict is significant for two reasons. First, the conflict provides an important glimpse into the Red Army during the interwar period. Second, the war offers insights into the integration of evolving technological and...

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11. A War of Consequences

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pp. 279-298

Telling the story of the 1929 Sino-Soviet conflict has always been a difficult task for historians. Writing in 1935, Eugene Lyons, the UPI Moscow correspondent in 1929, described the conflict as “serious enough in terms of casualties and political consequences, it remains to this day the...

Appendices

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pp. 299-308

Notes

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pp. 309-360

Bibliography

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pp. 361-378

Index

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pp. 379-400

Back Cover

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