Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-vi

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xii

The inspirations for this book have been many. Teaching the rich interdisciplinary approaches to design at Pratt inspired this book, not least through conversations with my colleagues Uzma Rizvi, Frank Millero, Carolyn Shafer, Tetsu Ohara, Rebecca Welz, and Deb Johnson. I am especially thankful to Deb for bringing...

read more

Introduction: Toward a History of Upcycling

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-14

Waste is a product of design. Design that does not take into account the use, disposal, and potential reuse of the designed artifact generates waste materials that burden ecosystems and municipal waste management systems. Industry and schools of art and design in the twenty-first century recognize this...

Part I: Creating a Technical Nutrient

read more

1. From Scarcity to Abundance

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 17-34

On Elm Street is a building that behaves like a tree. Most of the architecture on this street in Oberlin, Ohio, dates from the late nineteenth century; brick Victorians and wood-framed houses with expansive lawns and gardens dominate the block. But the Adam J. Lewis Center for Environmental Studies at...

read more

2. Designing Waste

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 35-53

Visitors to the artist Chris Jordan’s website might be initially confused to see an image of Georges Seurat’s 1884 painting A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte. The painting is a significant example of French neo-impressionism, but one normally finds reproductions of famous paintings in art...

read more

3. A Recyclable Resource

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 54-82

Brooklyn’s Sunset Park neighborhood is home to the world’s most beautiful recycling center, the Material Recovery Facility (MRF). Designed by architect Annabelle Selldorf’s firm (which also designs art galleries, museums, and libraries in Europe and the United States) and built at a cost of $110 million, the...

Part II: Designing Upcycled Goods

read more

4. Metal in Motion

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 85-102

Aluminum’s utility in aviation provided the basis for much of the innovation in aluminum production in the first half of the twentieth century, and aviation remained central in the volume and variety of aluminum produced after World War II. Cold War military investments in aviation by the United States and...

read more

5. Covetable Aluminum Furniture

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 103-132

Owning an iconic representative of mid-century modernism is easy if you have enough money and an internet connection. A consumer wishing to purchase an Eames Aluminum Group lounge chair or executive chair can go to the Design Within Reach website, search for “Eames chair,” and, with a couple...

read more

6. Guitar Sustain

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 133-158

How can three pounds of aluminum be worth $312,000? The metal has many applications, but the price of that amount of scrap aluminum on the open market is about $2. The answer has something to do with Charles Eames’s notion of covetables. Three pounds of aluminum sold at auction in 2007 for $312,000...

read more

Conclusion: Designing for Sustainability

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 159-166

Waste is a product of design, and design can salvage waste. Design has salvaged waste and created valuable goods, as this history of aluminum use has indicated. Recycling occurs because of economic and political factors. These include the market rate for salvaged material, the cost of reclamation versus disposal...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 167-192

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 193-199