Cover

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Title Page, Series Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

List of Illustrations

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

A book project such as this about real people in real places is dependent on the kindness of so many people. I am most indebted to all the people who spent an hour or two sharing the stories of their lives and work with me. I could not begin to capture all the interesting things they shared. For the...

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1. Getting Together at the Local Winery

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pp. 1-10

It’s a warm May evening, the first pizza night of the year at Mallow Run Winery in Bargersville, Indiana. My band, Acoustic Catfish, is performing at the event, and as we prepare to start our second set, more than three hundred people are gathered on the patio and spread across the hillside that gradually...

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2. The Long Road to the Midwestern Winery Boom

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pp. 11-27

When Indiana became a state in 1816, it already had a burgeoning wine industry. The big wine states of today, California, Oregon, and Washington, were mostly wilderness with some missions and outposts developing up the coast. Commerce between the Eastern states and the Midwestern territories...

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3. More than Marketplaces: The Attraction of Local Wineries

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pp. 28-48

My wife and I had cabin fever one cold Sunday in February 2007 and decided to take a drive in the snow-covered countryside southeast of Indianapolis. We meandered on country roads through eastern Johnson County, then cut west to I-65 at Franklin. Heading back north toward Indianapolis, we noticed...

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4. Becoming a Midwestern Vintner

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pp. 49-75

Midwestern winery owners have become involved in the business in a number of different ways. As the industry has begun to mature, some are second- or even third-generation owners who have taken over the businesses from their parents. Most others are wine lovers who started making...

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5. Wineries Are Work: Going “Backstage”

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pp. 76-102

When I was a child, I loved the part in The Wizard of Oz where Toto pulls the curtain back to reveal “the great and powerful Oz” as a bumbling old man who realizes his cover is blown. Winemakers are real wizards, mixing science and craft. They occasionally provide a glimpse of a barrel and perhaps a...

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6. Organizing the Midwest Wine Industry to Address Challenges

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pp. 103-132

Wine is a heavily regulated product. The purveyors of our Puritan heritage made sure that if they couldn’t successfully ban alcoholic beverages through legal means, as they tried with Prohibition, then they were going to make sure that the producers of those beverages were subjected to more than...

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7. The Challenges of Identity and Quality

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pp. 133-150

As a student of social and institutional change, I am interested in understanding what brings changes about in the world as well as what keeps change from happening. One thing we can’t change is where we are born or the circumstances we are born into. Winery owners certainly have some choice...

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8. Local Vino and Mondovino: Midwestern Wineries in the Global Context

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pp. 151-176

My friends and colleagues have joked numerous times that they would be happy to help me with my winery research. I explain that I’m writing about the Midwestern winery experience and the work of creating that experience, not just drinking wine. But of course, part of wine research is drinking...

References

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pp. 177-184

Index

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pp. 185-196