In this Book

US Latinization
summary
Demonstrates how educators and policymakers should treat the intertwined nature of immigrant education and social progress in order to improve current policies and practices.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. pp. i-iv
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-viii
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  1. List of Illustrations
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. Foreword
  2. Luis C. Moll
  3. pp. xi-xiv
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  1. Editors’ Introduction
  2. Spencer Salas and Pedro R. Portes
  3. pp. 15-24
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  1. Part I: The Shifting Social Geography of K-16 Communities
  1. 1. Building on Immigrant Parents’ Repertoires: Scaffolding Online Home-School Communication in New Latin@ Diaspora Contexts
  2. Silvia Noguerón-Liu, Deavours Hall, and Peter Smagorinsky
  3. pp. 3-22
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  1. 2. Increasing Immigrant Settlement and the Challenges and Opportunities for Public Education in Charlotte, North Carolina
  2. Paul N. McDaniel, Susan B. Harden, Heather A. Smith, and Owen J. Furuseth
  3. pp. 23-42
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  1. 3. Beyond Commodified Knowledge: The Possibilities of Powerful Community Learning Spaces
  2. Colleen M. Fairbanks, Beverly S. Faircloth, Laura M. Gonzalez, Ye He, Edna Tan, and Melody Zoch
  3. pp. 43-66
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  1. 4. Educating to Empower Latina/os in Mathematics in the New South
  2. Anthony Fernandes, Marta Civil, Altha Cravey, and María DeGuzmán
  3. pp. 67-88
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  1. 5. Ways of Knowing, Community/Technical College Workforce (Re)Development, and “El Mundo de Hoy”
  2. Mark M. D’Amico, Spencer Salas, Manuel S. González Canché, Cecilia Rios-Aguilar, and Gregory F. Rutherford
  3. pp. 89-108
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  1. 6. Professional Development and Funded Interventions as Means to Improve Latino/a Student Achievement: A Research and Development Perspective
  2. Rolf Straubhaar, Paula J. Mellom, and Pedro R. Portes
  3. pp. 109-122
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  1. 7. Que las maestras hablaran más con ellos: Children Grappling With Documentation Status at School
  2. Holly Link, Sarah Gallo, and Stanton Wortham
  3. pp. 123-140
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  1. 8. Topography of Trámites: Mixed-Status Families’ Map of the New Latino Diaspora
  2. Ariana Mangual Figueroa
  3. pp. 141-160
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  1. 9. The Maya Diaspora Yucatan-San Francisco: New Latino Educational Practices and Possibilities
  2. Patricia Baquedano-López and Gabriela Borge Janetti
  3. pp. 161-184
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  1. Part II: Research, Policy, and a Postfirst Generation
  1. 10. A Research Agenda for Latin@ Youth’s New Media Use in the New South: ¿Common sense for the common good?
  2. Donna E. Alvermann and Eliane Rubinstein-Ávila
  3. pp. 187-204
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  1. 11. Challenges to Policy as a Tool for Educational Equity: The Case of Language and Ability Difference Intersections
  2. Adai A.Tefera, Taucia Gonzalez, and Alfredo J. Artiles
  3. pp. 205-226
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  1. 12. The Limits of “A Thousand Points of Light” Ideology for a Latino Postfirst Generation
  2. Pedro R. Portes and Spencer Salas
  3. pp. 227-240
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  1. 13. The Latino Gender Divide in Education: Are Latinas Really Faring Better Than Their Brothers?
  2. Patricia Gándara
  3. pp. 241-250
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  1. 14. Immigration, Social Change, and Reactive Ethnicity in the Second Generation
  2. Alejandro Portes and Bryan Lagae
  3. pp. 251-272
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  1. Afterword
  2. Richard P. Durán
  3. pp. 273-280
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 281-290
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 291-303
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