Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Foreword

Dror Wahrman

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pp. ix-xii

Many years ago in Cambridge I heard an anecdote about Professor Peter Burke, which may well be apocryphal. But as historians we know that stories that are not true are often more revealing than those which are. The story was that when Peter came from...

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Preface

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pp. xiii-xvi

Like my parents, I have been lucky enough not to have the experience of exile, but all four of my grandparents were born outside Britain. My mother’s family were exiles in the sense that they were refugees, or to use...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-15

In 1891, at a time when this observation was not yet commonplace, the great historian of the frontier Frederick Jackson Turner remarked, “Each age writes the history of the past anew with reference to the conditions uppermost...

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1. The View From the Edge

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pp. 16-33

This book is concerned with the special contributions to knowledge made by exiles. For this reason it risks what may be called “triumphalism,” dwelling on successes and forgetting failures. Hence it is important...

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2. A Global Topic

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pp. 34-38

The contribution of exiles to knowledge is of course a global topic, as a few ancient, medieval, and modern examples —so many snapshots —may suggest.
In classical antiquity, discussions of exile range from positive to...

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3. Early Modern Exiles

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pp. 39-81

This chapter is concerned with what the German historian Heinz Schilling has called “confessional migration” at a time, the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, when “the religious refugee became a mass...

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4. Three Types of Expatriate

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pp. 82-129

As the introduction pointed out, the topic of exiles has generated a substantial historical literature. By contrast, expatriates have received relatively little attention from historians. The term “expatriates” is...

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5. The Great Exodus

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pp. 130-187

Following the French Revolution and especially the “Terror” of 1793–94, a wave of opponents of the new regime went into exile, some 180,000 of them altogether, moving over the frontiers to Colmar, for instance, to Brussels and to London. It was at this...

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A Comment on Brexit

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pp. 188-190

When I wrote the last paragraphs of this book, early in 2016, referring to countries that would have remained more provincial without the contribution of immigrant scholars, I did not imagine that in the June referendum the British electorate would vote...

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Appendix. One Hundred Female Refugee Scholars in the Humanities, 1933–1941

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pp. 191-204

The importance of art historians (half the total) is worth noting (though this figure may be the result of more intensive research on this discipline than on others). The number of female art historians who did not follow an academic career in exile but worked...

Notes

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pp. 205-242

Bibliography

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pp. 243-278

Index

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pp. 279-294