Half Title, Series Page, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Preface. Why Does College Matter?

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pp. ix-xvi

In order to talk about the role of extracurricular activities on the pathway to college, it is important to begin with the question we too often take for granted: Why would anyone want to go to college? You probably already know the answer: College matters because it is a key element in the class structure of the United States. ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xvii-xviii

My deepest appreciation goes to all of the individuals who helped make Students Together the welcoming, empowering, and transformative program that it was for so many young people over the years. From the visionary and founder, to the staff members, Americorps volunteers, undergraduate and graduate students, curriculum designers, and those in administrative roles behind the scenes, you have made a lasting impact. ...

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Chapter 1. Extracurricular Activities and Pathways to College

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pp. 1-30

Born in Mexico City, Ana immigrated to the United States at the end of first grade with her mother and sister, Victoria. Ana’s father, seeking a better life for his family, had previously immigrated and established a home in Bayside, a diverse urban community thirty minutes outside a major California city. Ana spoke no English when she enrolled at Jackson Elementary School. ...

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Chapter 2. Theorizing Educational Success and Failure

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pp. 31-57

Since the 1966 publication of the landmark Equality of Educational Opportunity, more commonly known as the Coleman Report, the achievement gap between low-income students of color and their middle-class white peers has become the focal point of educational reform efforts throughout the United States. ...

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Chapter 3. Auxiliary Influence. “It Was Fun . . . But I Don’t Remember Much”

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pp. 58-87

Ana, Julio, Miguel, Rosa, Benjamin, and Graciela all participated in the Students Together program as eighth graders at Adams Middle School in Bayside. After their year in the program, each graduated from high school and enrolled in college. Looking back, they each have positive memories from their time in the program. ...

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Chapter 4. Distinguishable Influence. “It Helped Me Find My Way . . .”

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pp. 88-119

Selena, Molly, and Teresa grew up in supportive families and did well in school, yet by the time they were sixth graders at Adams they did not feel as if they fit in socially. Although Selena had been elected to student council and enjoyed her time on the cheerleading squad, she saw herself as too outspoken and progressive for her peers. ...

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Chapter 5. Transformative Influence. “It Changed My Whole Life!”

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pp. 120-156

Felicia, Maria, and Victoria participated in the Students Together program as eighth graders at Adams Middle School. Like other Students Together participants, they learned how to communicate with a diverse team and craft public presentations. They came to see themselves as competent students and engaged community members. They felt supported by caring and knowledgeable adults and connected with other extracurricular programs. ...

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Chapter 6. The Differential Role of Extracurricular Activity Participation

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pp. 157-178

Latino youth are the fastest growing segment of the US population, yet their academic achievement has lagged significantly behind other ethnic groups. Scholars have looked to demographic, structural, cultural, and psychological factors to explain this gap; however, few existing theories recognize the role that structured out-of-school time programs can play in Latino, or specifically Mexican American, students’ school success. ...

Appendix. Methodological Reflections

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pp. 179-182

References

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pp. 183-194

Index

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pp. 195-200

About the Author

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