Cover

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Half Title, Series Page, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Acknowledgments

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I first became aware of the field of disability studies in my penultimate year of graduate school when the Michigan Quarterly Review published a double special issue on the topic. The issues included an array of pieces—by scholars and artists such as Tobin Siebers, Rosemarie Garland-Thomson, Joseph Grigley, Jim Ferris, Georgina Kleege, ...

Contents

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pp. ix-x

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Introduction

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pp. 1-18

Disability studies explores the embeddedness of bodies within cultures. Revising the medicalized and individualized understanding of disability—an understanding that places it outside of culture and discourse—disability studies locates disability in social and political relations among bodies and minds understood as impaired, bodies and minds granted the cultural capital of normalcy, and the built and social environment. ...

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1. Mobility and Sexuality

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pp. 19-54

In Virginia Woolf ’s 1927 essay “Street Haunting,” the narrator, playing the flâneuse with the excuse that she wants to buy a pencil, becomes satiated with the “beauty pure and uncomposed” of the London streets and decides to enter “some duskier chamber of being where we may ask . . . ‘What, then, is it like to be a dwarf?’” ...

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2. Blindness and Intimacy

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pp. 55-84

With the notable exception of Wilkie Collins’s Poor Miss Finch (1872), Victorian novels tended to depict blindness as something that either ruins one’s life or ends one’s text.2 Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre (1847), for example, by ending with Rochester regaining his sight, “endorses the ocularcentric belief that a person cannot live happily ever after without sight” ...

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3. Deafness, Communication, and Knowledge

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pp. 85-118

While the relative devaluation of vision in the early twentieth century resulted in comparatively positive portrayals of blindness in modernist literature, it also led to a heightened valuation of hearing, or what Melba Cuddy-Keane calls a “new aurality” (383). As Tim Armstrong argues, “if modernist aesthetics stress embodiment and contact, sound has a special status” ...

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4. Knowledge Redux: Sensory Disability in Ulysses

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pp. 119-142

In chapter 2 I explore ways in which modernist authors worked to detach blindness from its traditional partner, ignorance, and attach it instead to intimacy—while nevertheless relying on the association between sight and knowledge for their belief that blindness cuts one off from the superficial world. ...

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5. Deformity and Modernist Form

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pp. 143-196

In H. G. Wells’s The Island of Doctor Moreau (1896), Edward Prendick is startled when, disoriented from hunger and dehydration after a shipwreck, he meets a “misshapen man” with a “crooked back” and a “singularly deformed” face (6). This man serves as an assistant to a doctor called Montgomery, who has saved Prendick’s life. ...

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Epilogue

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pp. 197-204

As modernism enlisted disabled bodies in its myriad attempts to make literature new, it acknowledged the active role of bodies in our subjective lives, imagining links—both positive and negative—between disabled bodies and aspects of modernity. In Jean Rhys’s Good Morning, Midnight (1939) there is a sense that disability, though constantly disavowed, ...

Notes

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pp. 205-230

Works Cited

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pp. 231-252

Index

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pp. 253-258