Half Title, Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

Acknowledgements

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pp. vii-viii

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Introduction

Helena Goscilo, Stephen M. Norris

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pp. ix-xxii

The identity and status of cities inevitably changes with the years, though perhaps not in the perception of its residents, admirers, and detractors. Internationally, Rome continues to enjoy its long-standing (and tautological) reputation as the Eternal City, Paris remains the Center of Chic and Amour, and London, ...

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One. St. Petersburg and the Art of Survival

William Craft Brumfield

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pp. 1-38

Dostoevsky’s Underground Man called it “the most abstract and intentional city in the world.” The Comte de Ségur spoke of it as a “monument to the victory of genius over Nature.” For Andrei Bely, in his novel Petersburg, the city is a dot on the map of Russia, a dot without dimensions, whose existence is proclaimed by an endless stream of administrative circulars.1 ...

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Two. The City’s Memory: Texts of Preservation and Loss in Imperial St. Petersburg

Julie Buckler

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pp. 39-56

Petersburg’s chroniclers have long been preoccupied with the young city’s history and memory, or, to put it another way, these chroniclers have underscored Petersburg’s paradoxes of preservation and loss. Count Francesco Algarotti was among the first to observe this curious conflation of old and new, noting the dilapidated state of the city’s grand palaces, ...

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Three. Unsaintly St. Petersburg? Visions and Visuals

Helena Goscilo

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pp. 57-87

Though according to Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet alternate names for a rose would not diminish its seductive scent, the history of Russia’s occasional capital attests to the enormous political and psychological weight of nomenclature: Originally St. Petersburg, briefly Petrograd in 1919-1924, Leningrad from 1924, and now once more St. Petersburg—though in danger of becoming Putinburg— ...

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Four. A Tale of Two Cities: Ancient Rome and St. Petersburg in Mandelstam’s Poetry

Zara Torlone

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pp. 88-114

An Italian architect who helped to shape the imperial image of St. Petersburg, Carlo Rossi viewed the city as another Rome and drew his chief inspiration from the grandeur and opulence associated with the ancient empire. In twenty-six-year-old Rossi, son of an Italian ballerina who retired to the suburbs of St. Petersburg, ...

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Five. Petersburg in the Poetry of the Russian Emigration

Vladimir Khazan

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pp. 115-141

Petersburg is one of the recurrent and most extensive themes in Russian émigré literature, including poetry. In the artistic consciousness of those who found themselves outside of their native country after the October 1917 Revolution, the former capital of the Russian empire represented an important artistic space. ...

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Six. Multiethnic St. Petersburg: The Late Imperial Period

Steven Duke

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pp. 142-163

In May 2003 the city of St. Petersburg celebrated the 300th anniversary of its founding. Peter the Great’s famous “Window onto Europe” has seen significant changes over the last three centuries. The city that began as a rough settlement in a marshy river delta was transformed into an imperial capital before seeing revolution, civil war, Nazi siege, postwar reconstruction, and the proliferation of centrally planned apartment blocks. ...

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Seven. Leningrad Culture under Siege (1941–1944)

Cynthia Simmons

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pp. 164-181

The legacy of the Siege of Leningrad includes remarkable documents chronicling both unimaginable suffering and seemingly superhuman resilience. Among those who memorialized this catastrophe were some of the most astute minds and gifted writers of the Leningrad intellectual elite. Many of them pondered the new culture of the Siege in relation to previous siege warfare and the psychological ramifications of life under siege. ...

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Eight. Cultural Capital and Cultural Heritage: St. Petersburg and the Arts of Imperial Russia

Richard Stites

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pp. 182-196

In the years after 1991, and a bit earlier under glasnost, the reconstructed memory of St. Petersburg’s former cultural glories has often been mixed and sanitized in the elitist traditions not only of Soviet cultural conventions but of the Russian intelligentsia itself—especially its critical, curatorial, and historical establishments. ...

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Nine. Strolls Through Postmodern Petersburg: Celebrating the City in 2003

Stephen M. Norris

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pp. 197-218

On October 1, 1991, the residents of Leningrad voted to restore the old name of St. Petersburg to their city. The renaming took place as the Soviet Union was collapsing, and rethinking the past dominated Russian life. Although the symbolism of reverting to the original name eventually carried the day, the debate over St. Petersburg versus Leningrad was contentious, bringing numerous issues to the surface. ...

Contributors

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pp. 219-220

Index

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pp. 221-234