Title Page, Editors, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-x

In a book of this nature, which is primarily concerned with contests over the construction of public history, the range of people who have contributed to its production is very wide. It encompasses film and radio archivists, environmental activists, advertising agents, secretaries in government departments, curators...

Abbreviations

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pp. xi-xiv

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Introduction Journeys, Festivals, and the Making of National Pasts

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pp. 1-29

The week of 26 to 31 October 1992 was a busy one for D. F. Malan Airport in Cape Town. Relegated for years to a minor air terminal, largely carrying domestic traffic, strong predictions of an imminent end to white rule in South Africa saw the doors of the airport being opened to the international world...

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1. Van Riebeeck's Pasts

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pp. 30-83

When stories are recounted about the past of Jan van Riebeeck, the Dutch commander at the Cape of Good Hope between 1652 and 1662, they tell of his birth in Culemborg, his family background, his early days under the tutelage of his grandfather, the mayor of Culemborg, his apprenticeship as a surgeon, his joining...

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2. "We Build a Nation": The Festival of Unity and Exclusion

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pp. 84-143

Granger Bay is a small, protected inlet immediately to the west of Table Bay. It is adjacent to the Victoria and Alfred Waterfront, a resurrected part of Cape Town Harbor with a complex of shops, restaurants, bars, museums, hotels, and movie houses, all set in an imagined world of a re-constructed British maritime...

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3. Contesting Van Riebeeck's Nation

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pp. 144-179

At the "zero hour of our national life;' as Jan, Maria, and Lambertus van Riebeeck were making preparations for their landing at Granger Bay to commemorate "their three hundred years of rapine and bloodshed" and to prepare themselves for "another evil era of piracy and oppression;' Silas Modiri...

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4. "'n Fees vir die Oog" [A Festival/Feast for the Eye]: Looking in on the 1952 Jan Van Riebeeck Tercentenary Festival Fair

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pp. 180-215

The 1952 Jan van Riebeeck festival was planned as a visual extravaganza, a "spectacle" more than an "experience." There were few speeches, leaving as much time as possible for the crowds to take in the constant array of sights and be "dazzled" by the "huge canvas." The processions in the streets of Cape Town...

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5. Local and National Pasts: The Journey of the Mail Coach "Settlers" through the Eastern Cape

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pp. 216-241

The displays of the tercentenary festival of 1952 were centered on the figure of Van Riebeeck as the founder of a nation based on racial exclusivity with Cape Town as its place of origin. To make this Van Riebeeck spatially national, the organizers of the tercentenary of founding perceived it necessary to move beyond...

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Conclusion: Post Van Riebeeck

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pp. 242-256

In the years following the tercentenary festival, as attempts to maintain racially exclusive power in South Africa intensified, Jan van Riebeeck and Maria de la Quellerie found themselves increasingly cast as the lead characters in the first chapter of a "story of White Civilisation in South Africa:' The date of 6 April...

Notes

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pp. 257-290

Bibliography

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pp. 291-316

Index

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pp. 317-325