Half Title, Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Preface

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pp. 1-4

This book is the result of ethnographic research with deaf communities, and the methodologies of the case studies presented herein are discussed in their respective chapters. Their central feature is the cultural practices of signed storytelling that have been intergenerationally transmitted in deaf communities around the world for as long as they have existed. ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. 5-8

This book represents the incredible expertise of several treasured groups and individuals. The remarkable assistance and encouragement they have provided to this work has exceeded all my expectations many times over. ...

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1. Deaf Flourishing: A Framework for Developing Deaf People’s Identity and Empowerment

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pp. 9-33

The research presented in this book grew out of the life stories of Flemish deaf role models who have shared their stories of empowerment, identity, and learning with me. From my first study of these stories, I developed a fascination for this community’s emancipation, its members’ identity transformations, and the role of transnational interaction as revealed during signed storytelling in deaf clubs. ...

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2. Contributing to an Era of Epistemological Equity: A Critique and an Alternative to the Practice of Science

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pp. 34-55

In July 2010, the Organizing Committee of the International Congress on the Education of the Deaf (ICED) rejected the resolutions of the 1880 ICED conference that excluded sign language in deaf education, apologized for the negative consequences of these resolutions for deaf people worldwide,1 ...

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3. Deaf Ways of Education Leading to Empowerment: An Exploratory Case Study

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pp. 56-76

In the last 30 years, a new rhetoric has emerged: Deaf people are perceiving themselves as an ethnolinguistic minority group with their own culture (deaf culture) and their own language (sign language). Deaf people with this worldview reject the medical model of deafness, which views deaf people as having a physical problem that needs to be cured ( Jankowski, 1997; Lane, 1993). ...

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4. Translated Deaf People Moving toward Emancipation: A Case Study of International Deaf People at Gallaudet University

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pp. 77-103

This quote describes the awakening of KK (a deaf Nigerian woman)1 when she arrived at Gallaudet University in Washington, DC, the world’s only university for deaf people. At Gallaudet and in the United States, deaf people are educated by deaf and hearing professors using American Sign Language (ASL), ...

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5. The Challenge of “Serious” Scholarship: A Case Study of the Cameroonian Deaf Community

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pp. 104-125

In Chapter 2, I argued for cross-cultural comparisons using a descriptive approach instead of a top-down approach. In the current chapter, the question of how deaf indigenous knowledge can be valued during an ongoing research process1 (that is, what research methods are adequate) is illustrated by a discussion of the methodology I developed for an exploratory case study on emancipation processes ...

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6. Deaf Identity Revisited: 21st-Century Pathways of Nomadic Deaf Citizenship

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pp. 126-172

In April 2014, deaf/sign language community members gathered for the last meeting of the Flemish Deaf Parliament, a platform for participatory citizenship that was initiated by Ghent University and the Flemish Association of the Deaf (Fevlado) and organized by six local deaf clubs in the different regions of Flanders. ...

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7. Reflections of a Deaf Scholar: Toward an Anthropology of Deaf Flourishing

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pp. 173-214

In the decade since I began researching the topic of empowerment, the process of empowerment has also been at the core of my life, not just professionally but also personally. The (ethical) question of how research on deaf empowerment can also be empowering has always been salient. ...

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8. Nurturing Deaf Flourishing Sustainably in Times of Diversity

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pp. 215-241

In this chapter I explore processes of knowledge production during development practice using examples from deaf community meetings in Uganda as well as transnational interactions and dramatic performance in Cameroon. When looking into these processes, I have found that concepts of development “emerge from the wild” (i.e., in the settings themselves), ...

References

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pp. 242-266

Index

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pp. 267-276