Half Title, Series Page, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Preface and Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

We met in January 2006 as two brand-new, tenure-track assistant professors at the University of Connecticut, Department of Public Policy. It is a small department with a rigorous and growing Masters of Public Administration program, with a nationally ranked focus in public finance and budgeting. We connected over our common interest areas, somewhat unrelated to the strength of the department, and our junior status. ...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-10

Housing matters for everyone. Decent housing provides shelter, security, privacy, stability, and, for homeowners, a means to build assets. It is particularly important for survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV), who need safe, affordable, and long-term homes in order to escape and remain free from violence. ...

Part One. Why Long-Term Housing for Survivors of Intimate Partner Violence?

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Chapter 1. “Why Doesn’t She Leave?” Intimate Partner Violence and Housing Instability

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pp. 13-24

Intimate partner violence has many names: domestic violence, domestic abuse, couple violence, and, in the past, spousal violence and woman battering. IPV refers to violence in an intimate relationship such as dating, cohabitating, and marriage. The terms of victim and survivor are also used interchangeably, and thus can cause some confusion. ...

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Chapter 2. “How Does Housing Help?” A “Services-Light” Long-Term Housing Model

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pp. 25-40

IPV survivors like Victoria understand that housing is an integral piece of the support system that can enable survivors to leave their abusers, but it can also be a barrier that prevents them from doing so. In this chapter, we describe the experiences of Victoria and other residents at The Anderson, a building developed and operated by New Destiny Housing, ...

Part Two. The Current Policy and Service Environment. How Did We Get Here?

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Chapter 3. First Stop. Emergency Shelters and Transitional Programs

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pp. 43-59

The United States’ domestic violence shelter system originated with grassroots feminist organizing in the 1970s. The top priority of shelter organizers was to help women leave abusive situations, and that priority remains the same today. The battered women’s movement initially met this need with emergency shelters in which women, often with their children, could stay for short periods. ...

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Chapter 4. Mismatch between U.S. Social Policy and Intimate Partner Violence

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pp. 60-76

Intimate partner violence survivors often struggle when they leave emergency shelters and transitional housing. Many have trouble accessing or qualifying for housing, income, and other social safety net supports designed for low-income families. Advocates and providers have sought to make existing supports more accessible and effective for IPV survivors, and this work continues, ...

Part Three. An Evolving Approach. Long-Term Housing

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Chapter 5. National Overview. Legislative Response and Program Variations

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pp. 79-92

New Destiny Housing, the nonprofit organization that owns and operates the housing where Victoria lives and that we discuss in chapter 2, provides what it calls a services-light model to its residents. A full-time paraprofessional tenant support coordinator focuses on referrals and linkages to other specialized programs. This structure developed because the organization, like many others, must stretch scarce dollars to serve its residents. ...

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Chapter 6. Developing Program Theory and Goals. Long-Term Housing with Services

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pp. 93-104

Many survivors of intimate partner violence continue to live with their abusers because they feel trapped by their limited long-term options. Victoria stayed with her boyfriend long after she knew that his physical, psychological, and economic abuse was harming her and her son. Like many other survivors, she could not afford an apartment on her own. ...

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Chapter 7. Survivor Perspectives on Program Theory and Models

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pp. 105-122

Victoria, like many of her neighbors in The Anderson, felt that living in a building with on-site staff and services had direct and important impacts on various aspects of her life. We shared the stories of residents at The Anderson in chapter 2. Victoria’s overwhelmingly positive sentiment, however, ...

Part Four. Next Steps?

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Chapter 8. Moving Forward. Research and Policy

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pp. 125-132

In this concluding chapter, we choose to look forward rather than back. We reflect on opportunities and choices for IPV survivors, advocates, providers, and policymakers who want to broaden and refine housing options for survivors. The issue of housing for IPV survivors is a dynamic one, and thus cannot be neatly summarized. ...

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Epilogue. A Practitioner’s Perspective

Carol Corden

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pp. 133-142

A new unit of the New York Police Department devoted to domestic violence response was the focus of a July 2013 story in the New York Times. The story described two officers responding to a domestic violence incident at an address they had visited repeatedly. When they arrived, they went through the protocol again, advising the woman to press charges and to leave what was clearly a dangerous situation. ...

Appendix. Methods

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pp. 143-150

Notes

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pp. 151-154

Bibliography

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pp. 155-168

Index

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pp. 169-174

About the Authors

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