Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-iv

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. v-viii

read more

Introduction

James J. Murphy

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-6

This praise of Demosthenes by the Roman rhetorician and educator Marcus Fabius Quintilianus about the year 95 in the first Christian century1 is typical of Demosthenes’ reputation in the more than two thousand years since he delivered his most famous oration, On the Crown, in 330 BCE.

Even his opponent on that occasion, Aeschines, who went into exile following his defeat in this famous case, later praised his speech to the students he was instructing on the island of Rhodes. The story is told that Aeschines had been declaiming his own crown speech to...

Part One: Demosthenes and His Greatest Speech

read more

1. Demosthenes and His Times

Lois P. Agnew

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 9-35

The oration On the Crown arises from the life of a man who has for many centuries represented the power and complexity of Greek oratory. The abiding interest among western rhetoricians in the oratorical achievement of Demosthenes has created a biography whose outlines are a combination of fact and legend; at the same time, the scarcity of primary documents providing reliable information about that life ensure that the lines between the two have always been difficult to define. This biographical essay offers an overview of Demosthenes’ life for nonspecialist...

read more

2. Aeschines’ Speech Against Ctesiphon: An Abstract

Donovan J. Ochs

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 36-45

The sources of biographical data for Aeschines are essentially restricted to his three extant speeches Against Timarchus, On the Embassy, and Against Ctesiphon —and the orations of his rival, Demosthenes. From these sources we know that of the two men Aeschines was older. His birth is placed between 403 and 390 BCE. Demosthenes was born in 384 BCE.1 When the Crown speeches were given, therefore, Demosthenes was fifty-four years old, Aeschines well over sixty. The careers of both orators are curiously similar, and their bitter encounters may be explained,...

read more

3. Demosthenes’ Oration On the Crown: A Translation

John J. Keaney

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 46-102

(1) * My first words, men of Athens, are a prayer to all our gods and goddesses that in this trial I may depend on as much good will from you as I have continually maintained toward our city and toward all of you; secondly—something which concerns your piety and your reputation to the highest degree—I pray the gods to implant in your minds the thought that you should not let my opponent advise you of the manner in which you should listen to me (for that would be harsh) (2) but that you be guided by the laws and your oath, which imposes the special obligation...

Part Two: Rhetorical Evaluations

read more

4. A Structural Analysis of the Speech On the Crown

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 105-113

Reprinted by permission of the publisher from The Oration of Demosthenes on the Crown, translated by Francis P. Simpson; rhetorical commentary by Francis P. Donnelly, SJ (New York: Fordham University Press, 1941), pp. 340–45.

Editor’s note.—The complex relationships between the various parts of Demosthenes’ speech may be seen quickly in the detailed outline provided here. The numbers used refer to sections of the speech, marked...

read more

5. Ēthos in "On the Crown"

David C. Mirhady

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 114-129

Near the beginning of his speech Demosthenes uses a very common form of argumentation in forensic oratory, the challenge (proklesis), whereby the speaker offers to allow the entire dispute to rest on a single issue, often to be decided even by a specific procedure, such as the torture of a slave or someone swearing an oath. Here Demosthenes argues that the case should rest entirely on the type of person he is versus the type of person Aeschines is.1 That is, he wants the case to rest on the question of character. From a legal point of view the offer is meaningless...

read more

6. Crafting Nostalgia: Pathos in On the Crown

Richard A. Katula

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 130-147

Demosthenes’ performance in On the Crown is, perhaps, the quintessential testament to the words of Quintilian, “The orator must be at his greatest when the proofs are against him; his finest achievement is a tear in the eye of the judge. In awakening it, he performs his most characteristic function.”1

From a strictly legal point of view the proofs were against Demosthenes. Aeschines had the better case, and for three reasons.2 The decree to award Demosthenes a crown was challenged by Aeschines through a graphe paranomon (prosecution for illegalities) against...

read more

7. On the Deinos Logos of On the Crown

Jeffrey Walker

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 148-173

Lalia

The preliminary chat, spoken from the sophist ’s chair.

It isn’t noticeable, probably, and I hardly have improved on the available translations, but I have spent the last few afternoons attempting to create my own version of this famous passage from On the Crown—one that would somehow fully render its undeniable deinótēs, or “forcefulness,” which I suspect every reader of this text has felt, to some degree, in any translation, and especially in the...

read more

8. Demosthenes’ Style: Lexis in On the Crown

Richard Leo Enos

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 174-204

Demosthenes’ fame as a Greek orator is largely attributed to his mastery of style. His ability in the rhetorical canon of style transcended his own time and culture. A lthough many of Demosthenes’ orations have been preserved and translated, his On the Crown is widely acknowledged to be his stylistic masterpiece. Dionysius of Halicarnassus considered Demosthenes’ speech to be the finest example of style in all of Greek oratory.1 No less an orator than Marcus Tullius Cicero considered Demosthenes’ ability and range of style to be a model for Roman rhetoric, as it had been...

read more

Epilogue

James J. Murphy

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 205-208

Demosthenes’ oration On the Crown is evidence of an exception to the rules of the world. That is, it shows that the whole can indeed be greater than all its parts.

The reader of this book can learn that a wide range of elements come together to make this speech a true masterpiece of persuasion. Surely ethos and pathos and logos and lexis all play a role in the impressiveness of the oration, as our authors point out so well. No adequate analysis is possible without considering the role of each of these elements. Yet they...

Select Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 209-222

Contributors

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 223-224

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 225-232

Landmarks in Rhetoric and Public Address: Also in this series

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 233

Back Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF