Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

List of Illustrations

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pp. ix-x

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Preface

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pp. xi-xvi

According to the 2010 US census, the population of the United States grew by 9.7 percent from 2000—from 281.4 million to 308.7 million.1 However, the Asian population increased 46 percent during the same period, from 11.9 million to 17.6 million—the largest rate of growth of all race groups in the country. The largest percentage of the Asian population, 46 percent, lived in the western United States. The second largest percentage of Asians, 22 percent, lived in the South. While the number of Asians rose in every region between 2000 and 2010, the Asian population grew the fastest...

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Introduction

David M. Reimers

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pp. 1-10

The South in the United States has become a population magnet, while the country as a whole grows at a slow pace due to the recent economic recession. The South’s warm climate, job opportunities, and cheaper housing have continued to draw Americans from other states as well as immigrants from foreign countries. According to a census taken in 2006, more than half of the population growth in the United States in the previous year occurred in southern states.1 The Sun Belt will gain new seats in Congress based on the southern population shift indicated in the census in 2010.2 The Sun Belt states...

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1. The Astonishing History of Japanese Americans in Louisiana

Greg Robinson

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pp. 11-28

The history of Japanese settlement in Louisiana, whether in the metropolis of New Orleans or in the bayous, is obscure and discontinuous, but their presence in the state’s history has been surprisingly substantial and multivalent. This is a first effort to draw together the myriad little fragments that make up the Japanese American experience in Louisiana, piece together a narrative from them, and try to tease out some larger conclusions.

Ethnic Japanese were far from being the first Asians to arrive in Louisiana. Historians have traced the story of the “Manilamen,” Filipino...

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2. Views of Japanese in Alabama, 1941–1953

Chizuru Saeki

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pp. 29-48

This chapter examines the history of Japan-Alabama relations during World War II and the postwar period. In this time span, political and social conflicts between Japan and the United States helped shape images of Japanese in Alabama. The chapter takes the point of view of cultural historians to analyze these perceptions. It looks at how Alabamians responded in the wake of the Pearl Harbor attack and how their views of Japan and Japanese culture changed over the following decades.

The Satsuma orange and camellia symbolize Alabama-Japan relations. In 1878 the Satsuma orange, which originated in Kagoshima...

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3. Collective Aspirations of Japanese Americans in and beyond the WWII South

John Howard

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pp. 49-72

Perhaps more hurtful than all the intimidation and fear, bigotry and violence, corruption and confinement, Japanese American incarceration was characterized by constant separation and partings. An immigrant generation that had embarked upon the biggest of journeys, to a new continent, found they had many more journeys yet to make. Some, understandably, grew weary. In 1945, however, many Nisei—described as “pathetically eager” to be American—called upon the shopworn maxims of American mobility. A new frontier! Westward, ho! Go west, young man! Westward the course...

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4. Asian Immigration to Florida

Raymond A. Mohl

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pp. 73-107

At the beginning of the twenty-first century, few states could challenge Florida’s Sunbelt growth image and megastate status. Now the fourth largest state, following California, Texas, and New York, Florida had a dramatically rising demographic trajectory for most of the twentieth century. Indeed, between 1900 and 2000, the state’s population growth rate never fell below 23.5 percent a decade; it was much higher than that during the boom years of the 1920s (52 percent), the 1950s (79 percent), and the 1970s (44 percent). Northern migration always provided a major source of Florida’s population...

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5. Chinese in Florida: History, Struggles, and Contributions to the Sunshine State

Wenxian Zhang

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pp. 108-131

As the southernmost state in the United States of America, Florida is famous for its sunshine beaches and tourist attractions. Though it is believed that Native Americans settled in the Florida peninsula for thousands of years, the written history of the state did not begin until 1513 when Juan Ponce de Leon allegedly sighted the Florida coast and landed in Saint Augustine. There was no record of a Chinese population by the time Florida attained statehood in 1845. It was only after gold was discovered in California in 1848 that the Chinese began to arrive in the United States in large numbers, most...

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6. “Chinese for the South”: Mississippi Delta Chinese Migration Chains

John Jung

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pp. 132-154

Early Chinese immigrants from the mid-nineteenth century until the late 1960s came primarily from Guangdong Province in southeastern China. They settled predominantly in the western and Rocky Mountain states, where many lived in or near communities with a sizeable Chinese population. However, as early as the 1860s, a few of these immigrants found their way to the midsection of the country, including the southern states, where they lived in social and cultural isolation.

The Delta Chinese settled over a large area, covering roughly one hundred miles from just below Memphis in the north...

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7. Second-Generation Chinese Americans from Atlanta, Augusta, and Savannah, Georgia: Overcoming “Otherness”

Daniel Bronstein

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pp. 155-197

Second-generation Chinese Americans from Georgia, born roughly between 1910 and 1950, grappled with the larger national tension between being forever foreign or embracing the attributes of honorary whiteness during the 1950s and 1960s. The conflict was complicated by their residing in a state rigidly segregated based on racial differences between white and black. The small Chinese presence prevented the creation of Chinatowns and the legal recognition of where they and the few other Asians stood in the biracial hierarchy of Georgia. Southerners of European and African heritage also...

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8. Immigrant Dreams and Second-Generation Realities: Indian Americans Negotiating Marriage, Culture, and Identity in North Carolina

Vincent H. Melomo

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pp. 198-233

Either born or raised in the South, second-generation Indian Americans1 speak with a southern accent, love their college sports, are active in local civic life, and generally would like to someday raise their families in the South. However, at the same time, they are also in varieties of ways maintaining ties to India and participating in a transnational, diasporic culture that changes and challenges existing constructions of southern identity and culture. Some second-generation Indians are finding spouses in India, some are working for or creating businesses and nonprofits with operations in India, and most...

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9. Resilient History and the Rebuilding of a Community: The Vietnamese American Community in New Orleans East

Karen J. Leong, Christopher A. Airriess, Wei Li, Angela Chia-Chen Chen, and Verna M. Keith

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pp. 234-248

As the floodwaters receded from New Orleans and rebuilding began, new stories of race relations emerged and new histories were written. One is the history of a predominantly Catholic Vietnamese American community located in eastern New Orleans. Before Hurricane Katrina, Vietnamese Americans constituted fewer than 1.5 percent of the city’s population. Since Katrina, the small Vietnamese American community in eastern New Orleans has received significant press coverage due to its members’ high rate of return and the rapid rebuilding of their community. This essay will explore how shared...

Contributors

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pp. 249-252

Index

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pp. 253-259