Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-x

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xiv

In addition to gainful employment at Brigham Young University during the years of work on this book, I am grateful for those who have helped fund it. At BYU, those entities include the College of Family, Home, and Social Sciences; the Department of History; the David M. Kennedy Center for International...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-11

In December 1859, with John Brown’s raid on Harpers Ferry having shaken his beloved Union once again to its core, Edward Everett rose to address a mass meeting in his hometown of Boston. This audience knew Everett not only for his long career as a scholar and politician but also for his most recent...

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1. Scholar, Preacher, and Paper Warrior

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pp. 12-36

On 11 April 1794, Oliver and Lucy Everett welcomed their fourth child, Edward, into their home in the Boston suburb of Dorchester. Oliver, who came from a long-standing but rather undistinguished Massachusetts family, had raised his economic and social position by earning an education from Harvard and the...

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2. The House: Doughface

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pp. 37-59

Edward Everett served his district in the House of Representatives for a full decade, engaging with a wide variety of issues. But his first speech in Congress, with its controversial expressions on slavery, would become by far the best known part of that career. It and others of his congressional expressions...

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3. The House: Whig Nationalist

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pp. 60-89

For all the considerable shadow which his D’Auterive and knapsack efforts cast, Everett’s congressional career was multifaceted and complex. More than any other thing, he was an ardent party and nation builder through this period of sectional turmoil, and those roles sent him careening in more than one direction...

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4. The Governor and the Abolitionists

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pp. 90-122

Massachusetts voters elected Edward Everett as their governor in 1835 and reelected him every year until he left office in 1840 after a narrow defeat. Had he had his way Everett would have focused entirely on his Whig improvement agenda, but one of the defining themes of Everett’s gubernatorial years was...

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5. Good Cop: Minister to Great Britain

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pp. 123-151

Everett and his family spent over five years in Europe, embarking from New York to France in June 1840, going to represent their country in London beginning in late 1841, and arriving in Boston from Liverpool in September 1845. Despite both personal and professional adversity during his nearly four years...

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6. Harvard President and Semi-Private Citizen

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pp. 152-184

Perhaps in no period of Edward Everett’s life did the antislavery reformer and the conservative Unionist sides of him compete so equally than between his return from England and late 1852. Everett held no political office during these years, but he did not experience that fact as anything like a luxury. While he...

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7. Shooting Star in Washington: Secretary of State and Senator

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pp. 185-209

After the relative obscurity of the early 1850s, from late 1852 to the end of 1853 Edward Everett saw his political star rise to dizzying heights, including widespread talk of an 1856 presidential nomination. This political prominence was very much a function of that brief period’s atmosphere of sectional and partisan...

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8. Saving Mount Vernon

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pp. 210-242

After a year in the political wilderness, in the second half of the 1850s Edward Everett emerged into perhaps the most significant and enjoyable era of his varied career. He threw enormous newfound energy into the deeply political but consciously nonpartisan effort to purchase Mount Vernon for, and thereby...

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9. Last Ditches: Union Meetings,the Election of 1860, and the Secession Crisis

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pp. 243-268

As the sectional politics of slavery continued to put Everett and his kind on the defensive, they continued their creative search for ways to stay engaged in American political life. From December 1859 through November 1860, Everett and like-minded politicians ran an interim test of the political significance...

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10. Civil Warrior

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pp. 269-309

The American Civil War that Edward Everett had tried so hard to prevent became in many ways his finest hour. The outbreak of open war clarified the confusions of the secession winter for Everett as it did for so many other Americans. As the length of the war grew and Everett’s support for it continued, he...

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Conclusion

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pp. 310-322

Everett’s death touched off mourning throughout the Union. The legislatures of Maine, New York and Michigan passed resolutions of grief. So did the boards of colleges and historical societies in places including New York City, Philadelphia, Chicago, and St. Louis. Union Clubs from New York to San Francisco also...

Appendix A

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pp. 323-324

Appendix B

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pp. 325-326

Notes

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pp. 327-390

Bibliography

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pp. 391-426

Index

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pp. 427-434