Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright Page

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-vi

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

read more

Preface to the First Edition

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-xii

THE HURDY-GURDY has been in continuous use in Western Europe for a thousand years; few other instruments can make that claim. In the thirteenth and eighteenth centuries it was found in the most musically cultivated circles; in the fourteenth through the seventeenth centuries, it was played by the lowest classes. Today, it is a popular folk instrument in France, much like the banjo in American music.
The story of the hurdy-gurdy, or, as it is known in France, the vielle, is so interesting that much has been written about its use in different periods. In such surveys, the cultivation of the vielle in eighteenth-century France represents only a chapter, but so many beautiful instruments and so much information, relatively...

Acknowledgments for the Second Edition

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xiii-xiv

read more

Introduction to the Second Edition

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xv-xxvi

The hurdy-gurdy is distinguished by two features: a rosin-covered wheel that rubs against the strings producing a continuous sound, and tangents that touch the melody strings at predetermined points to change the pitch. Most hurdy-gurdies have one or more drone strings playing an octave and/or fifth below the open, or unstopped, melody strings. The wheel is turned by a crank operated by the right hand, while the left hand depresses keys with the tangents mounted on them. 1 The keys are enclosed in a slotted key box with a cover that protects the mechanism and provides some support for the left hand. The range of the instrument—the number of keys—has over the centuries expanded from an octave in the earliest medieval instruments...

read more

1 Historical Background

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-24

The English term hurdy-gurdy is used to describe two different instruments. First, there is the mechanical organ with a mechanism much akin to that of a player piano that was played earlier in this century by immigrants who begged for money with monkeys and tin cups on the street corners of American cities. These instruments are still found in European parks and on street corners and are differentiated from the hurdy-gurdy by other names, such as orgue de Barbarie in French. For many, the term hurdy-gurdy first calls to mind this instrument....

read more

2 The Music

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 25-49

In the seventeenth century, a well-established tradition of vocal chamber music permeated the upper classes. The air , a solo song accompanied by the lute, or later the harpsichord, and bass viol was the most frequent form of home entertainment. Instrumental chamber music consisted mainly of solo works for harpsichord, lute, or viol (unaccompanied). The publications of the solo part book Pièces à une et à deux violes in 1686, followed by its companion continuo part book three years later, represent the first instrumental solo-bass collections published in France. All of the vocal and instrumental works mentioned above had one element in common not found in the music of other countries: the solo part was sufficient unto itself and could be performed without accompaniment. Later in the...

read more

3 Musical Interpretation and Performance Practice

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 50-65

Eighteenth-century treatises and scores themselves provide considerable information about how the music was interpreted and about technique, but, as with all sources before the twentieth century, they leave many of the most basic questions unanswered. Eighteenth-century treatises are generally uninterested in the most efficient muscular motion, for example. This seems to be considered a personal problem to be solved by the player. But perhaps the most important unanswered question is, how did the music actually sound?...

read more

4 The Repertory

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 66-88

The following is a list of publications and manuscripts that mention the vielle as an instrument that may be used to play the music contained therein. As has been shown elsewhere, the list s of alternate instruments on title pages of eighteenth-century French publications are not haphazard. On the contrary, they are arranged in a hierarchical order, the most suitable instruments being listed first. This principle is particularly important in examining the works for vielle, as almost always the musette is listed as a suitable instrument as well. The most suitable of the two instruments is generally listed first: a work designated as for “vielle or musette” is primarily suited to the former, but a work designated for “musette...

read more

5 The Vielle in the Literature of Seventeenth- and Eighteenth-Century France

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 89-102

Around 1648 the poet and courtier Vauquelin des Yveteaux (ca. 1567–1649) left the sensual pleasures he had enjoyed in Paris and went into retirement in the town of Brianval near Meaux. In the following poem he contrasts his previous life in Paris at the court of Henry IV with the “natural” existence of the countryside:...

Appendix: Avertissements in the Works of Jean-Baptiste Dupuits

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 103-108

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 109-114

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 115-119