Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

First and foremost we would like to thank all children and families whose lives are portrayed in this book. In different parts of the world, busy families with seven-year-olds welcomed our research team members into their lives. They showed us their homes, their gardens, their favorite objects, and their pets, while we sipped juice, coffee or tea. They sang favorite tunes, danced, shared their compositions, musical toys, and electronic devices in our presence. They also laughed, frowned, smiled, and showed concern as they answered some of our most intriguing questions. Some even shared secrets, anxieties, and deepest fears with us. This...

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Introduction: MyPlace, MyMusic: Children’s Home Musical Experiences Across the World

Beatriz Ilari and Susan Young

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pp. 1-26

Framed predominantly by methods and theories from developmental psy­chology and usually with the school as a main locus, research on children’s music education has at times endorsed the view of music as a “ thing” to be learned by specific social and cultural groups. Music education research has also embraced, for the most part, the logic that music learning and development occur in universal stages, moving in a somewhat linear fashion from simple to complex with adult abilities as the endpoint, and with little exploration of contextual issues. This is made evident by the large volume of controlled studies on the musical...

Section I. Theoretical Framework and Methods

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pp. 27-28

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1 Musical Childhoods: Theoretical Background and New Directions

Susan Young

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pp. 29-42

In undertaking this project we aimed not only to increase our knowledge of children’s everyday and home ­ based musical experiences but also to contribute to a shift in the theoretical paradigm within which children are being conceptualized musically. In recent years there has been a noticeable change in the way that children’s musical activities and experiences are being viewed and understood. A number of texts have focussed on children’s musical cultures in a range of locations (e.g., Boynton and Kok, 2006; Campbell and Wiggins, 2014; Whiteman and...

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2 The Project Wiki: Enabling and Transforming the Methods and Processes of Research

Jèssica Pérez ­Moreno

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pp. 43-54

In this chapter, I describe and discuss the adoption of a wiki platform to support the processes of collaborative research carried out by the team participating in the international project MyPlace, MyMusic. The aim of the chapter is twofold: on the one hand, it highlights how the adoption of the wiki enabled and transformed the research methods and processes and, on the other hand, it also hopes to encourage other research teams to adopt a social media platform as a framework for gathering data for their studies....

Section II. Thematic Interpretations

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pp. 55-56

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3 Public and Secret Musical Worlds of Children

Claudia Gluschankof

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pp. 57-68

Playing a musical “ thing” with her teddies at home is the well ­ kept secret of Charlie (the British girl), which she let go, prob ably without planning it, during the interview. What is she telling us through this secret? Is Charlie the only one among the children in the project that had a musical secret? Even if some or most of them had musical secrets, are those lived only within their life at home or also in their musical lives out of the home?...

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4 Belonging and Identity: Exploring Gendered Meanings of Musicking in Seven-Year-Olds

Elizabeth Andang’o and Caroline Brendel Pacheco

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pp. 69-79

The windows on children’s musical experiences in the home that we gathered in this project offer some insights into the way children learn to see themselves, to know their position in the world in relation to others, and to feel a sense of belonging to a certain social class, ethnicity, and gender. In this chapter we explore how music offers a set of experiences through which “our” children could make sense of themselves as boys or girls....

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5 Nurturing MyMUSICal Child: Parental Perspectives and Influences

Theano Koutsoupidou

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pp. 80-91

The roots of music education and development lie in the very beginning of one’s life. Prenatal music as a means of the formation of musical tastes, preferences, attitudes, and practices is increasingly acknowledged in research that establishes links between prenatal and postnatal life (e.g., Parncutt, 2009). Children’s initial musical experiences play a substantial role in their later musical behaviors. Children are recipients of many stimuli: parents, siblings, school, social and cultural networks become valuable sources of music knowledge, practice, and satisfaction. Musical experience and knowledge can be gained through...

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6 Middle-Class Musical Childhoods: Autonomy, Concerted Cultivation, and Consumer Culture

Beatriz Ilari

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pp. 92-106

Social class is one of several important markers of childhood socialization as it directly impacts how children interact with family members, peers, and teachers, in a wide range of social groups and institutions (Kaufman, 2005; Lareau, 2010). In the past few decades, a considerable body of work on social inequality, social mobility, and status attainment has emerged, particularly in the field of sociology. Regarding social mobility, an area that has received much attention pertains to the reproduction of social class standing from one generation to the next...

Section III. New Ideas

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pp. 107-108

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7 Nurturing the Musical “Open-Earedness” of Seven-Year-Olds

Diane Persellin

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pp. 109-119

Today’s seven-year-old children exhibit openness and excitement about many genres of musical styles experienced in their everyday lives and in their ever widening world. As these young children from around the world are growing out of their early childhood, they continue to enjoy singing, dancing, moving, and playing at home or on the playground alone or with extended family members as they have since they were toddlers. Many still delight in sharing songs that they...

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8 Musical Childhoods in South Africa: “The Times They Are a-Changin”

Sheila C. Woodward

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pp. 120-138

A rainbow nation at the southern tip of Africa, ablaze with a diversity of colors and cultures, sees many children today enjoying lives once barely imaginable. Until two decades ago, South African society had long been forcibly split along racial lines that denied the majority of children many basic human rights. I was born into a political era dominated by a policy euphemistically known as “Separate Development,” or “Apartheid,” in which children lived in neighborhoods...

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9 The Influence of Parental Goals and Practices on Children’s Musical Interests and Development: A Perspective on Chinese Families in Singapore

Chee­ Hoo Lum

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pp. 139-149

Being an avid music lover, the father of eight-year-old Elvi used this Confucius saying from Sishu Wujing (Four books and five classics) written before 300 BCE, as justification for why he feels music should be cultivated in his child so that she can grow up to be a good person; a person who is cultured, resilient, and developed with the right moral values. Parents in Chinese Singaporean families often acknowledge, as does Elvi’s father, that “childhood is a much treasured part of the life process within the Chinese family and as the child grows and develops, he...

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Conclusion: Lessons Learned

Beatriz Ilari, Susan Young, and Claudia Gluschankof

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pp. 150-162

Some years ago, as a group of early childhood researchers was contemplating a picturesque view of the hills of Frascati, Italy, a research project titled “MyPlace MyMusic” came about. A few months (and many exchanged email messages) later, data were collected from different corners of the world and shared through a wiki. Translated interviews, field notes, jottings, musical recordings, videos, photos, drawings, maps, and others were carefully examined and became the source material for the chapters that make up the current volume. Here, we aimed...

References

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pp. 163-178

Contributors

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pp. 179-182

Index

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pp. 183-186