Cover

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Half Title, Series Info, Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-viii

The editors gratefully acknowledge the support of the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Indiana University–Purdue University Indianapolis Arts and Humanities Institute in the preparation of this work. ...

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Introduction: Deep Maps and the Spatial Humanities

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pp. 1-6

The word deep has become academic kudzu, a wildly proliferating adjective that attaches itself onto everyday concepts and often makes them impenetrable to average readers. Consider the following examples: ...

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1. Narrating Space and Place

David J. Bodenhamer

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pp. 7-27

Over the past two decades, the humanities and social sciences especially have advanced a more complex and nuanced understanding of space. For nongeographers, this intellectual movement, often labeled the “spatial turn,” has been largely defined by a greater awareness of place, manifested in specific sites where human action occurs. ...

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2. Deep Geography—Deep Mapping: Spatial Storytelling and a Sense of Place

Trevor M. Harris

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pp. 28-53

Deep mapping, spatial storytelling, and spatial narratives are incomplete terms struggling to capture and imbue meaning to abstract thoughts of a more profound, insightful, reflexive, multimedic, perhaps quixotic representation of humanistic space than currently prevails. To focus on the term deep mapping emphasizes William Least Heat-Moon’s1 ...

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3. Genealogies of Emplacement

John Corrigan

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pp. 54-71

Keokuk, Iowa, calls itself “the geode capital of the world.” For the last century and a half, collectors have walked the streambeds of the local tributaries of the Mississippi River extracting the popular rocks from the hundreds of outcroppings of the Lower Warsaw Formation that surround the city. ...

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4. Inscribing the Past: Depth as Narrative in Historical Spacetime

Philip J. Ethington, Nobuko Toyosawa

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pp. 72-101

In the humanistic disciplines, maps have a historical dimension. The historical dimension of any map is, in one leading sense, its “depth.” This is the focus that we shall pursue, through an examination of examples from seventeenth-century Japan and twenty-first-century United States. ...

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5. Quelling Imperious Urges: Deep Emotional Mappings and the Ethnopoetics of Space

Stuart C. Aitken

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pp. 102-133

Questions about the setting in virtual motion of spaces, times, and technologies by and through bodies form a core discussion in geography. The arts and humanities have been inextricably linked to understanding these events since at least the mid-seventeenth century, but the last century in particular witnessed a mighty series of spatial and technological turns. ...

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6. Deep Mapping and Neogeography

Barney Warf

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pp. 134-149

The construction and representation of difference, in whatever form, are core intellectual concerns of the humanities and social sciences. Acknowledging how different forms of knowledge are produced, their relations to daily life, identity, and social practice, and their epistemological implications are profoundly important. This theme is also a deeply geographic question, as knowledge is deeply embedded within particular spatial environments. ...

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7. Spatializing and Analyzing Digital Texts: Corpora, GIS, and Places

Ian Gregory, David Cooper, Andrew Hardie, Paul Rayson

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pp. 150-178

Once upon a time not so very long ago, it was all very simple—information technology (IT) was concerned with storing and analyzing databases of numbers. The discipline of statistics—which predated computing by centuries—provided suitable techniques for taking the large amount of numbers held in a database and summarizing them and the relationships between them, using a much smaller number of summary statistics and graphics. ...

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8. GIS as a Narrative Generation Platform

May Yuan, John McIntosh, Grant DeLozier

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pp. 179-202

Maps have long been one of the key tools to represent the landscape within which histories occurred. While being static, maps present the spatial dimension of historical data and reveal spatial associations among spatial features of interest. Much research in spatial histories or historical geographical information systems (GIS) rises to the challenge of visualizing historical social data, ...

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9. Warp and Weft on the Loom of Lat/Long

Worthy Martin

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pp. 203-222

Human agency and action occurs in space-time and is conceptualized in numerous social and cultural aspects. To focus on one such aspect can provide a discipline through which a coherent narrative can emerge. Fundamental to this chapter and, indeed, this whole volume, is that electronic, internet-accessible resources enable the creation and dissemination of narratives ...

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Conclusion: Engaging Deep Maps

Trevor M. Harris, John Corrigan, David J. Bodenhamer

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pp. 223-234

Deep mapping arose out of the imaginary of the spatial humanities, and while it is conceptually rich, it is also methodologically complex and largely untried. Deep maps are enmeshed in the cartographic metaphor, but instances of deep mapping may extend from spatialized text, to immersive environments, to infinite depth presentation systems, to neogeography, and the geospatial web. ...

Contributors

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pp. 235-238

Index

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pp. 239-242

Further Series Titles

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