Cover

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Frontmatter

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Postcolonial Whiteness: A Critical Reader on Race and Empire

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p. iii

CONTENTS

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pp. vii-viii

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PREFACE AND ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

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pp. ix-x

This book began life in April 2000, as a panel at the Seventh International Caribbean Women Writers and Scholars Conference, Universidad de Puerto Rico, Mayaguez. My fellow panelists, Lisa Blansett and Linda Strong-Leek,were also my colleagues at Florida International University, where we were all assistant professors. A third FIU colleague, Ryan Trimm, had planned to...

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1. INTRODUCTION: WHITENESS AFTER EMPIRE

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pp. 1-30

Whiteness is not, yet we continue for many reasons to act as though it is. It would seem a simple enough assumption that the end of colonialism ushers in the end of whiteness, or at least of its unrivaled ascendancy. Yet the cultural residues of whiteness linger in the postcolonial world as an ideal, often latently, sometimes not....

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2. THE BODY OF THE PRINCESS

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pp. 31-52

Most cultures frown on necrophilia. In America and Britain we actively encourage it. When Diana, Princess of Wales, was alive, we desired her; we fantasized about touching her, consuming her, even if at the passive distance of a television screen or newspaper page. In the likeness first used clumsily by her brother Lord Spencer, then more elegantly by editorial writers and...

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3. LAVENDER AIN’T WHITE: EMERGING QUEER SELF-EXPRESSION IN ITS BROADER CONTEXT

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pp. 53-77

Richard Delgado and Jean Stefancic's edited collection entitled Critical White Studies: Looking Behind the Mirror, is fascinating on a number of levels, and apparently rather comprehensive—with sections dealing with the question of how whites see themselves and see..

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4. WHITENESS IN POST-SOCIALIST EASTERN EUROPE: THE TIME OF THE GYPSIES, THE END OF RACE

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pp. 79-102

...“I believe America taught our son’s killer to hate African-Americans.” This is how Camille Cosby’s controversial article starts in the July 8, 1998, issue of USA Today (Cosby, 15A). “Presumably,” she continues, “Markhasev did not learn to hate black people in his native country, the Ukraine, where the black population was near zero. Nor was he likely to see America’s...

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5. VAMPIRIC DECOLONIZATION: FANON, “TERRORISM,” AND MUDROOROO’S VAMPIRE TRILOGY

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pp. 103-118

Long before the fact of Australia was ever confirmed by explorers and cartographers it had already been imagined as a grotesque space, a land peopled by monsters.1 The idea of its existence was disputed, was even heretical fora time, and with the advent of the transportation of convicts its darkness seemed confirmed. The Antipodes was a world of reversals, the dark...

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6. “WHITE TALK”: WHITE SOUTH AFRICANS AND THE MANAGEMENT OF DIASPORIC WHITENESS

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pp. 119-135

In the extremity of its intergroup dynamics, South Africa has always been instructive to those with an international perspective on the issue of interracial and intercultural relations.1 The history of settlement and conquest and the subsequent cultural stratification within the society bears similarities to most of the territories that were part of Europe’s expansion across the...

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7. THE COLOR OF SCHIZOPHRENIA

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pp. 137-153

This chapter intervenes in emergent cross-cultural discussions about mental illness: it calls for replacing the confrontational politics of psychiatry versus antipsychiatry with a proactive linking across both disciplines and former colonies of discourses about mental illness. The question of “colonial madness”1—an unusually high incidence of diagnosed psychosis among colonial...

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8. THE GAZE OF THE WHITE WOLF: PSYCHOANALYSIS, WHITENESS, AND COLONIAL TRAUMA

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pp. 155-181

Given that psychoanalysis has at times appeared as a metanarrative that would bring itself to bear on a subject composed of more or less universal components and impacted by the same transcendental forces regardless of gender, ethnicity, etc., it has come under attack by contemporary theorists of race, gender, and culture. Notable recent critiques include Gayatri Spivak’s...

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9. “MOTLEY’S THE ONLY WEAR:” HYBRIDITY, HOMELANDS, AND CONRAD’S HARLEQUIN

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pp. 183-200

In 2000, I was on sabbatical, writing about a woman who was born in Czarist Russia. She grew up stateless in China, learned English at the age of twenty, and first came to the United States in the 1930s on a Chinese diplomatic passport issued by the then occupying Japanese regime. Desirous of becoming an American citizen, she pressured Senator Fulbright to get her...

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10. HYMNS FOR AND FROM WHITE AUSTRALIA

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pp. 201-229

How is the Austrailian soul stirred, officially and unofficially? What can we learn of that soul and its prisoners (to put a Foucauldian construction on things) from the songs that serve to stir patriotic sentiment among Australians?...

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11. THE TIMES OF WHITENESS; OR, RACE BETWEEN THE POSTMODERN AND THE POSTCOLONIAL

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pp. 231-253

Frantz Fanon tells his imagined interlocutor in “The Fact of Blackness” that “you come too late, much too late. There will always be a world—a white world—between you and us . . . [t]he other’s total inability to liquidate the past once and for all” (Fanon 1952, 122; ellipsis in original). Attempts to shore up identity or forge relationships find that it is race that mediates...

CONTRIBUTORS

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pp. 255-256

INDEX

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pp. 257-261