In this Book

summary

Each year in the United States, hundreds of religious buildings and schools become vacant or underutilized as congregations and populations merge, move, or diminish. These structures are often well located, attractive, eligible for tax credits, and available for redevelopment. In this practical and innovative handbook, authors Simons, DeWine, and Ledebur have compiled a step-by-step guide to finding sustainable new uses for vacant structures. The reuse of these important buildings offers those charged with revitalizing them an opportunity to capture their embodied energy, preserve local beloved landmarks, and boost sustainability. Rehabbing presents an opportunity for developers to recoup some value from these assets. Neighbors and other stakeholders also enjoy benefits as the historic structures are retained and the urban fabric of communities is preserved.

Retired, Rehabbed, Reborn features ten in-depth case studies of adaptive reuse outcomes for religious buildings and public schools that have achieved varying degrees of success. Several case vignettes appear within various chapters to illustrate specific points. The book is a useful tool for architects, planners, developers, and others interested in reusing these important structures. In addition to covering the demographics of demand and supply for historic buildings, the authors demonstrate how to identify a worthy project and how to determine a building’s highest and best use, its market potential, and its financial feasibility, including costs and public subsidies. Finally, they address the planning process and how to time the redevelopment and repurposing of these venerable buildings.

Simons, DeWine, and Ledebur explain that while each rehab deal is unique and tricky—especially for prominent community structures that hold significant nostalgic and historical value to community stakeholders—there are identifiable patterns of successful and unsuccessful approaches, patterns that are addressed in turn throughout the redevelopment process.

As the nation moves toward a mind-set and practice of recycling, reusing, and repurposing, this unique exploration of how that applies to buildings is an essential guide for anyone interested in being part of the process as communities develop and change.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Series Page, Copyright
  2. pp. i-iv
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
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  1. Preface
  2. pp. vii-viii
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. 1. Introduction
  2. Robert A. Simons
  3. pp. 1-8
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  1. Background Trends
  1. 2. The Changing Landscape of Sacred Buildings.
  2. Larry Ledebur and Eugene Choi
  3. pp. 11-30
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  1. 3. A Statistical Analysis of Religious and School Building Rehabilitation in the United States
  2. Robert A. Simons and Eugene Choi
  3. pp. 31-52
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  1. Practical Feasibility
  1. 4. The Architect’s Perspective on Relative Costs and Benefits of Building Rehabilitation Versus New Construction.
  2. Robert A. Simons, Scott Dimit, and Gary DeWine
  3. pp. 55-76
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  1. 5. Market Analysis Techniques for Religious and School Building Rehab Projects
  2. S. Subha Vyakaranam and Robert A. Simons
  3. pp. 77-100
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  1. 6. Financing the Adaptive Reuse of Religious Buildings and Schools.
  2. Adam N. Saurwein and Robert A. Simons
  3. pp. 101-128
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  1. 7. Dollars and Cents of Adaptive Reuse of Religious Buildings and Schools
  2. Adam N. Saurwein and Robert A. Simons
  3. pp. 129-148
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  1. 8. Winning Community Approval: The Planning Process for Religious Building Adaptive Reuse Projects
  2. Robert A. Simons, Rose A. Zitiello, and Gary DeWine
  3. pp. 149-164
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  1. Policy
  1. 9. The “Highest and Best” in Adaptive Reuses
  2. Larry Ledebur
  3. pp. 167-188
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  1. 10. From “Temples of Consumption” to “Temples of Faith”
  2. Larry Ledebur and S. Subha Vyakaranam
  3. pp. 189-196
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  1. 11. Conclusion
  2. Robert A. Simons and Youngme Seo
  3. pp. 197-218
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  1. Case Studies
  1. 12. The Red Door Church, Cleveland Heights, Ohio
  2. Robert A. Simons, Gary DeWine, and S. Subha Vyakaranam
  3. pp. 221-232
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  1. 13. Adaptive Reuse of the Dutch Reformed Church into the Jamaica Performing Arts Center, Queens, New York
  2. Robert A. Simons
  3. pp. 233-242
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  1. 14. Adaptive Reuse of the Deutsche Evangelical Reform Church into the Urban Krag Rock Climbing Gym, Dayton, Ohio
  2. Gary DeWine
  3. pp. 243-252
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  1. 15. Adaptive Reuse of Saints Peter and Paul Catholic Church into Residential Condos, South Boston, Massachusetts
  2. Robert A. Simons
  3. pp. 253-264
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  1. 16. Adaptive Reuse of Asbury Methodist Church into Babeville Performing Arts Center, Contemporary Art Gallery, and Corporate Offices, Buffalo, New York
  2. Gary DeWine
  3. pp. 265-276
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  1. 17. Archdiocese of St. Louis: Sale of Twenty Church Properties and St. Aloysius Gonzaga Property Reuse into Magnolia Square Residential Development, St. Louis, Missouri
  2. Gary DeWine
  3. pp. 277-296
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  1. 18. St. Joseph Church Conversion Case Study, Fayetteville, Arkansas
  2. Gary DeWine
  3. pp. 297-312
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  1. 19. West Tech High School, Cleveland, Ohio
  2. Robert A. Simons and Gary DeWine
  3. pp. 313-332
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  1. 20. Central Arkansas Case: Schools in Little Rock and Clinton Cultural Campus
  2. Gary DeWine and Robert A. Simons
  3. pp. 333-350
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  1. Glossary
  2. pp. 369-372
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 373-382
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Additional Information

ISBN
9781631012556
Related ISBN
9781606352564
MARC Record
OCLC
964460190
Pages
480
Launched on MUSE
2016-11-30
Language
English
Open Access
No
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