Cover

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Half Title, Frontispiece, Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Foreword

Daniel J. Basta

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pp. vii-viii

Although understanding history is so vital to understanding our future, it is often difficult to draw attention to its meaning and lessons. But there are certain events and subjects that can and have drawn people to them. For a wide range of Americans, and others, there is a no more compelling event than the December 7, 1941, attack on Pearl Harbor. ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

A large number of friends and colleagues supported the research necessary for this book, providing opportunities and information freely from the beginning of our research in the 1980s. Terry Kerby and Steve Price, whose detailed research in the archives and on the seafloor revealed two Pearl Harbor midget submarines off O‘ahu, ...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-7

The Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, was a combined aerial and naval assault that covered a large area of sea, sky, and ground. Like a number of naval battles in World War II, the events and combat at “Pearl Harbor” took place within a vast battlefield landscape that encompasses hundreds of square miles when all aspects of the attack are considered. ...

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Chapter One. The Development of the Japanese Midget Submarine Program

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pp. 8-24

The development of the submarine as a weapon for naval warfare was a centuries-old dream for some and a nightmare for others.1 The desire to develop a working submarine began with experiments in undersea warfare in the early eighteenth century when small wood, brass, and copper craft emerged. ...

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Chapter Two. Midget Submarines at Pearl Harbor

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pp. 25-58

The idea of using the kō-hyōteki in the attack on Pearl Harbor reportedly began in the ranks of the midget submarine corps. Both Lieutenant Naoji Iwasa, the 27-year-old chief test pilot for the kō-hyōteki, and Sublieutenant Keiu Matsuo believed that the rise of naval air power had doomed decisive battles between opposing fleets. ...

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Chapter Three. Aftermath: Legend and Reality

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pp. 59-81

On December 19, a despondent Admiral Matome Ugaki , chief of staff for the Combined Fleet, wrote in his diary that reports had been received from Washington, DC, that the United States had captured “some” of the kō-hyōteki. Ugaki feared now that Japan’s secret weapon was no longer a secret, the United States “will take defensive measures against the use of that type of sub, ...

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Chapter Four. The End of the Midgets

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pp. 82-109

As the I-boats and midget submarines of the Second Special Attack Flotilla sortied to the Indian Ocean and Australia, Japanese naval planners were hard at work assessing the next major fleet operation, a massive naval strike at Midway and the Aleutians, to seize the islands and establish an eastern defensive perimeter for Japan, as well as provide a base for closer strikes at Hawai‘i. ...

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Chapter Five. The Ward Midget

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pp. 110-139

There are two fundamental aspects to the full archaeological understanding of Pearl Harbor’s midget submarines: a nautical (naval) and a maritime (battlefield) aspect. The first focuses on the individual craft—in this case the Type A kō-hyōteki employed at Pearl Harbor and, with modifications, at Diego Suarez, Sydney, ...

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Chapter Six. The Three-Piece Midget

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pp. 140-166

By the morning of December 8, three of the midget submarines had been encountered by US forces: the craft sunk by USS Ward, the craft sunk by USS Monaghan, and Sakamaki and Inagaki’s I-24 tou, which lay awash on a coral reef on the opposite shore of O‘ahu with Sakamaki in custody as “POW No. 1.” ...

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Chapter Seven. Archaeology, Memory, Management, and Protection

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pp. 167-178

This book began with a discussion of how historical and maritime archaeology expanded its frontiers in the late twentieth century to embrace battlefield archaeology and how battlefield archaeology in the early twenty-first century has grown to include naval battlefields. At Pearl Harbor, this has been reflected by the transformation of the initial project of the early 1980s ...

Appendix. Anatomy of the Type A Kō-Hyōteki

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pp. 179-194

Notes

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pp. 195-202

References

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pp. 203-216

Index

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pp. 217-226

Back Cover

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