Cover

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Half Title, Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-v

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-viii

As an intellectual, political, and affective project, the idea and praxis of “friendships across borders” inform our own friendship, politics, and the respective relationships we have in and beyond the academy. The two of us met at a Global Feminisms Summer Institute in 2005 at Cornell University. ...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-8

Several years ago, a number of U.S. feminists organized “hijab day,” a day when women of all religions and ethnicities would don the hijab in a gesture of solidarity with believing women who wore the hijab on a daily basis. The intention was to deflect the negativity directed against Muslim women in the United States, and to diffuse attention by forming a much larger group. ...

Part One: Praxis of Friendship

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1. Epistemic Friendships: Collective Knowledge-Making through Transnational Feminist Praxis

Nicole Nguyen, A. Wendy Nastasi, Angie Mejia, Anya Stanger, Meredith Madden, Chandra Talpade Mohanty

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pp. 11-42

“Thinking justice, teaching for justice, and living justice means that we continually challenge each other to enunciate our vision of justice . . . we all have ownership in this new vision; no single one of us stands in a proprietary relationship to it, for it is to be collectively imagined, collectively guarded, collectively worked out” (Alexander 2005, 114). ...

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2. Meditations on Friendship: Politics of Feminist Solidarity in Ethnography

Azza Basarudin, Himika Bhattacharya

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pp. 43-68

Transnational feminist praxis enables epistemological and methodological frameworks that attend to intersectional relations of power (gender, race, sexuality, class, nation) and prioritizes accountability and transparency in understanding women’s struggles on their own terms (Chowdhury 2011; Grewal and Kaplan 1994; Mohanty 2003; Mohanty and Alexander 1997; ...

Part Two: Gender, Nation, Solidarity

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3. Bridging the Divide in Feminism with Transcultural Feminist Solidarity: Using the Example of Forging Friendship and Solidarity between Chinese and U. S. Women

Yuanfang Dai

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pp. 71-90

The theme of solidarity is important from at least two perspectives: (1) from the epistemological perspective, women have different experiences of gender oppression and do not automatically come together collectively to strengthen each other, so solidarity is a political strategy for them to recognize gender oppression on a macroscopic scale; ...

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4. For Sister or State? Nationalism and the Indigenous and Bengali Women’s Movements in Bangladesh

Kabita Chakma, Glen Hill

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pp. 91-116

This is the story of two women’s movements. One is the outwardly successful story of the mainstream Bengali women’s movement. The other is the lesser-known and previously untold story of the indigenous women’s movement in the remote Chittagong Hill Tracts of Bangladesh. Over the last forty years, the stories of these two women’s movements have often intersected. ...

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5. Solidarity through Dissidence: Violence and Community in Indian Cinema

Alka Kurian

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pp. 117-140

In this chapter I examine cinematic portrayal of dissident friendships, in particular among women, located across differences of class, caste, faith, and ideological positions, expressed particularly during moments of extreme crisis. I aim to investigate the persistence of these antihegemonic solidarities between the privileged and those located in communities decimated as a result of communal and state-led violence. ...

Part Three: Neoliberalism, Agency, Friendship

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6. Kinship Drives, Friendly Affect: Difference and Dissidence in the New Indian Border Cinema

Esha Niyogi De

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pp. 143-159

Some years back, Maria Lugones persuasively argued that friendship is more appropriate as an ideal for feminist bonding than any model of relationship associated with family and kin. A kin metaphor such as sisterhood presumes, on the one hand, that women will bond together “unconditionally” rather than out of particularized “appreciation” for another (1995, 136). ...

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7. The Space Between Us: Reading Umrigar and Sangari in the Quest for Female Friendship

Elora Halim Chowdhury

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pp. 160-181

This chapter is an exploration of the idea of friendship between women across cultures as a basis for social and political transformation. Deploying a transnational feminist analysis, I enjoin Thriti Umrigar’s novel The Space Between Us with Kumkum Sangari’s essay “Consent, Agency, and Rhetorics of Incitement” to further a discussion on solidarity among women. ...

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8. Who Are “We” in the Novel?

Shreerekha Subramanian

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pp. 182-200

Arundhati Roy’s documentary film, We (2006, 64 minutes), offers significant ideas for breaking down global polarizations—North and South, capitalists and impoverished, status-bearers and the protesters, and also what I see as the yawning divide between the academic and the popular. ...

Part Four: Friendship Across Borders

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9. A Spirit of Solidarity: Transatlantic Friendships among Early Twentieth-century Female Peace Activists (Wilpfers)

Laurie R. Cohen

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pp. 203-220

On January 21, 1893, Hedwig von Pötting (1853–1915), an Austrian canoness (nun), wrote one of her very first letters to fellow Austrian feminist writer, peace advocate, and baroness by marriage Bertha von Suttner (1843–1914). Theirs was to become an enduring friendship: ...

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10. The Dissidence of Daily Life: Feminist Friendships and the Social Fabric of Democracy

Lori E. Amy, Eglantina Gjermeni

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pp. 221-240

I could not call myself a “dissident.” I was born in 1968 in Kruja, a small town in northern Albania. My mother was only nineteen years old when I was born. I was trained early by my family, in school, by the state media, to be a “good” girl, a good Albanian, the state’s version of a “good” person. ...

Contributors

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pp. 241-246

Index

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pp. 247-260

Further Titles

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