Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

List of Illustrations

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pp. ix-x

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xii

This book had an unusual inception. While researching my previous work, The League, a history of the American Protective League—the Justice Department’s volunteer detective force during World War I, I came across a thrilling account about a German raider called the Alexander Agassiz that was captured by a U.S. Navy gunboat off the coast of Mexico. ...

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Prologue: “The Morelos Will Be Ours”

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pp. 1-14

The mutiny on board the federal gunboat Tampico began over love for a woman. It was said that twenty-four-year-old Lieutenant Hilario Malpica, the ship’s executive officer, had fallen for a brown-eyed beauty whose family was devoted to the Constitutionalist cause. ...

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1. A Simple Business Transaction

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pp. 15-34

The harbor at Mazatlán was one of the busiest in the country in 1917. Even with a reduction in trade due to the war in Europe, Mazatlán remained the principal port of entry on the west coast of Mexico and business was still good enough to keep the dock workers busy from morning until dusk. ...

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2. “I Will Shoot You Down like a Dog!”

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pp. 35-62

The streets of old Mazatlán were paved with cobble stones, and as level as the waves of an ocean storm. There was no planning as the city expanded; it had grown a block at a time as the need arose. Streets could be wide at one end and narrow at the other, and when the end was reached, a half-block turn might be required before continuing. ...

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3. The Alexander Agassiz

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pp. 63-80

The white schooner struggled into Mazatlán harbor and dropped anchor. Listing heavily to starboard from an unbalanced load, her mainsail tossed across the decking like a worn rag, the latest voyage of the Alexander Agassiz had ended in ignominious failure. ...

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4. For Honor and Fatherland

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pp. 81-90

In September 1917, six months before Cornelius Heintz began overhauling the tired schooner, an eminent person booked passage on the Alexander Agassiz for a trip from Mazatlán to Manzanillo—Fritz Unger, managing partner of Melchers Sucs and German consul. ...

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5. “She Is an Outlaw and a Dangerous Enemy”

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pp. 91-108

Prominent among the buildings that lined the Olas Altas, the broad roadway that fronted Mazatlán harbor, was the American consulate, a two-story structure built in the Spanish style of old Mazatlán, with smooth sides of white cement, barred windows at street level, ...

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6. “If You Want to Get the Best of Uncle Sam, Get Up before You Go to Bed”

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pp. 109-126

Long columns of infantry in field-gray uniforms extended as far as the eye could see, as sixty-two German divisions marched toward the front. The final German offensive in France, expected to force a tremendous breakthrough and end the war in victory for the Fatherland, was about to begin. ...

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7. “The Germans Are After You”

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pp. 127-146

As the sun descended behind the tree line in the Mazatlán estuary, the birds and reptiles prowling through the darkening mangroves in search of food were startled by a flash of light and strange sounds emanating from the water near the Cervecería del Pacífico brewery. ...

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8. United States of America vs. Alexander Agassiz

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pp. 147-172

The crew of the Alexander Agassiz had been in captivity for almost two weeks when they were taken from the San Diego county jail by U.S. marshals and delivered to the federal building for trial. The prisoners were a disheveled and ragged-looking lot, still wearing the clothes that they had on when captured aboard the schooner off Mazatlán. ...

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9. Going For Broke

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pp. 173-194

At the same time that Maude was reclaiming the Alexander Agassiz in San Diego, on the other side of the world, the final attack of the great German spring offensive was being driven back by the Allied forces. The German campaign captured substantial French territory and inflicted heavy casualties, but in the end, was stopped forty miles from Paris. ...

Notes

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pp. 195-218

References

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pp. 219-220

Index

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pp. 221-226

Images

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