Cover

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Half Title, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-vii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-xii

This book examines, among other things, the constraints of popular literary conventions. The scholarly monograph has its own constraints, and they are most acutely felt on the acknowledgments pages. This small space cannot possibly accommodate the gratitude I want to express to the many people, over many years, who have helped bring this book into being. ...

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Introduction: Aesthetics, Politics, and Literary Convention

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pp. 1-29

In this book I examine women writers’ responses to nineteenth-century U.S. Indian policy and explore the ways their unconventional politics informed and transformed conventional literature. Long before the Women’s National Indian Association asserted in 1888 that “the Indian Question must become more and more a woman question,” ...

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1. Nameless Outrages: The Dakota Conflict, Rape Rhetoric, and Sarah Wakefield’s “Captivity” Narrative

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pp. 30-66

In 1864, having lived through a spate of interracial violence on the plains of Minnesota, Sarah Wakefield found herself embroiled in a different kind of battle. The armed struggle between Dakota insurrectionists and the U.S. military that began on August 17, 1862, now known as the Dakota War or Dakota Conflict, had raged for six weeks, ...

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2. “She Wept Alone”: The Politics and Poetics of Lydia Sigourney’s Indian Laments

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pp. 67-112

The March 12, 1831, issue of the Cherokee Phoenix, and Indians’ Advocate features Lydia Sigourney’s “The Cherokee Mother,” one of a handful of published poems that expressly protest the Indian Removal Act of 1830.1 The poem imagines a Cherokee woman on the threshold of exile who confronts the whites who have forced her and her family from their home: ...

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3. Reading Lessons: Sentimental Critique in S. Alice Callahan’s Wynema: A Child of the Forest

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pp. 113-151

Early in S. Alice Callahan’s 1891 novel Wynema: A Child of the Forest, Genevieve Weir, a white mission teacher among the Muscogee (Creek) Indians, writes home boasting of her favorite student’s progress on the path toward assimilation. ...

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4. Talking Back: Ora Eddleman’s “Indian Magazine” and Native Publicity

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pp. 152-199

“Lo, the poor Indian, with pastepot and shears! The teepee exchanged for the sanctum, war paint for printer’s ink, and the scalping knife for the blue pencil. It is a Cherokee woman who has wrought this marvel, and the paper she edits is called the Twin Territories.”1 ...

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Epilogue: Toward a Theory of Feminist Indigenist Reinvention

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pp. 200-216

This book has brought together four very different writers in order to expand the sense of nineteenth-century women’s aesthetic and political expression. Sarah Wakefield, Lydia Sigourney, S. Alice Callahan, and Ora Eddleman challenged both the political regimes and the generic expectations of their times. ...

Notes

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pp. 217-248

Index

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pp. 249-255

About the Author

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Back Cover

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