Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. ix-x

Heartfelt thanks are due to Sarai Santos in the English Department at Trinity University and Bonnie Lander at Florida Atlantic University for their considerable help in preparing the manuscript for publication. We are also grateful for the generous support of both of our institutions, ...

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Chapter 1. On the Periphery: The “Tangled Roots” of Holocaust Remembrance for the Third Generation

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pp. 3-40

“The origin of a story is always an absence,” intones the narrator of third-generation writer Jonathan Safran Foer’s novel, Everything Is Illuminated, the story of a young man in search of his grandfather’s past.1 This search will take the narrator out of his familiar middle-class American life into the unknown and unstable territory of the Ukraine, ...

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Chapter 2. The Intergenerational Transmission of Memory and Trauma: From Survivor Writing to Post-Holocaust Representation

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pp. 41-66

The movement from survivor writing to second- and third-generation accounts of the Nazi genocide marks an important shift in the intergenerational transmission and expression of Holocaust memory, trauma, and representation. The passage from firsthand, eyewitness testimony to second- and thirdhand, ...

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Chapter 3. Third-Generation Memoirs: Metonymy and Representation in Daniel Mendelsohn’s The Lost

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pp. 67-106

The geographic center of this story is the remote Ukrainian village of Bolechow, the village of Mendelsohn’s grandfather Abraham Jäger’s birth. While his grandfather fled to America before the war, his grandfather’s brother Shmiel, of whom he never spoke, along with his wife Ester and their four daughters, Bronia, Frydka, Lorka, and Ruchele, ...

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Chapter 4. Trauma and Tradition: Changing Classical Paradigms in Third-Generation Novelists

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pp. 107-146

The Jewish tradition assigns great theological weight to historical events. The covenant between God and the Jewish people invests history with a transcendent meaning and holds the people to account for any deviation from the covenantal path. From the biblically based assertion, “we are punished for our sins” (mipenei hataeinu), ...

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Chapter 5. Nicole Krauss: Inheriting the Burden of Holocaust Trauma

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pp. 147-170

A grandchild of Holocaust survivors and the author of three novels, Man Walks into a Room (2002), The History of Love (2005), and Great House (2010), Nicole Krauss admits that while the Holocaust is a manifest presence in her work, she cannot write her ancestors’ stories the way survivors or their children have written about the Shoah. ...

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Chapter 6. Refugee Writers and Holocaust Trauma

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pp. 171-196

Judith M. Gerson points to the fact that “there is no universal understanding of the terms refugee, survivor, and immigrant.” Nevertheless, the distinctions are important for several reasons: “First . . . [they] indicate the comparison that immigrants make when referring to themselves in contrast to refugees or survivors.” ...

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Chapter 7. “There Were Times When It Was Possible to Weigh Suffering”: Julie Orringer’s The Invisible Bridge and the Extended Trauma of the Holocaust

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pp. 197-230

At the close of Julie Orringer’s novel The Invisible Bridge, the American-born granddaughter of Holocaust survivors Andras and Klara Lévi recognizes not only her family’s fortuitous gains, but also their immeasurable loss. For all those who, like her grandparents, survived the war and succeeded in reassembling their lives, ...

Notes

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pp. 231-244

Bibliography

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pp. 245-254

Index

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pp. 255-263