Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Half Title, Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. v-vi

read more

Preface

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-x

Conspiracy theory has a long history in the United States. It has animated our political culture from the early Republican period to the present, at times powerfully swaying popular opinion. But its influence has never been greater than now. Since 1950, an extraordinary number of writers have used expressions of paranoia and conspiracy theory to represent the influence of postwar technologies, ...

read more

Introduction: The Culture of Paranoia

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-46

In 1957, Vanee Packard described a postwar phenomenon he found deeply troubling. "Large-scale efforts:" he claimed, are "being made, often with impressive success, to channel our unthinking habits, our purchasing decisions, and our thought processes by the use of insights gleaned from psychiatry and the social sciences" (3). ...

read more

Chapter 1: Bureaucracy and Its Discontents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 47-80

In the years immediately following World War 11, a handful of popular sociological studies suggested that a fundamental change was occurring in American society. This transformation, so the story went, was a response both to the rise of the information sciences, systems theory and cybernetics, ...

read more

Chapter 2: Bodies Incorporated

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 81-106

A screaming comes across the sky. This is how Gravity's Rainbow opens—not with a scream, nor with a screaming rocket, but simply with a screaming, a bodily expression of panic so disembodied that it only hints at a cause beyond itself. ...

read more

Chapter 3: Stalked by Love

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 107-132

In a comment about her 1972 novel, Surfacing, Margaret Atwood suggests that her protagonist's sense of being haunted, or hunted, by men can be understood as a ghost story, the sort where "the ghost that one sees is in fact a fragment of one's own self which has split off" (G. Gibson 29). ...

read more

Chapter 4: Secret Agents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 133-160

"In modern North American history:' writes Fredric Jameson, "the assassination of John F. Kennedy ... gave what we call a Utopian glimpse into some collective communicational 'festival' whose ultimate logic and promise is incompatible with our mode of production" (355). ...

read more

Chapter 5: The Logic of Addiction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 161-184

"Addiction," remarked social psychologist Stanton Peele in 1975, "is not, as we like to think, an aberration from our way of life. Addiction is our way of life" (Love and Addiction 182). By all accounts, this view has gained remarkable popularity in America. Not on1yare estimates of traditional substance abuse significantly higher, despite declining narcotic and alcohol consumption, ...

read more

Epilogue: Corporate Futures

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 185-202

The stories of postmodemism that have been unfolding over the past decade or so have frequently included, among their central elements, a psychopathological model of historical change: the modem period, so the story goes, was dominated by expressions of alienation and paranoia, while the postmodem period has been characterized by fragmented, schizophrenic forros.1 ...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 203-218

Works Cited

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 219-232

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 233-239