Cover

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Half Title, Frontispiece, Title Page, Copyright, Series Page, Quotations

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

List of Abbreviations

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pp. ix-xiv

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Preface

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pp. xv-xx

The idea of producing a scholarly and densely annotated but readable English translation of the critical edition of the Vālmīki Rāmāyaṇa goes back to the summer of 1969, at which time two of the edition’s seven books, the Yuddhakāṇḍa (1971) and Uttarakāṇḍa (1975), had not yet even appeared in print. ... ...

Guide to Sanskrit Pronunciation

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pp. xxi- xxii

Part I. Introduction

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1. Preamble and Synopsis of the Uttarakāṇḍa

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pp. 3-11

The contents of the Uttarakāṇḍa are to a very great extent strikingly different from those of virtually all the other kāṇḍas of the epic. As we have noted elsewhere,1 the Rāmāyaṇa as a narrative tends, with certain exceptions,2 to remain sharply focused on the adventures of the central hero, Rāma. ...

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2. The Major Characters of the Uttarakāṇḍa

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pp. 12-35

A study of the characters of the Uttarakāṇḍa presents a more complex and, in some ways, more difficult task than have our parallel studies in the introductions to the previous volumes of this translation. One of the reasons for this is the very structure and purpose of the book. ...

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3. The Rākṣasas of the Uttarakāṇḍa

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pp. 36-53

From its very beginning, the Uttarakāṇḍa draws us into the world of the rākṣasas. It could be argued that the entire poem is obsessed with these dreaded creatures of the night, who haunt the epic from its first book. In addition to the many encounters that the epic heroes have with these demonic creatures, ...

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4. The Work of the Uttarakāṇḍa

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pp. 54-64

As we, along with many earlier students of the Rāmāyaṇa, have noted, the Uttarakāṇḍa shows considerable evidence in many of its sections of a somewhat later composition than the bulk of the central five books of the poem, books 2 through 6.1 Moreover, the characterization of some of the epic’s central figures, particularly Rāma, ...

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5. Who Knows the Uttarakāṇḍa?

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pp. 65-73

Aside from the technical issues summarized above, there are a number of reasons why authors of some of the innumerable texts that recount the tale of Rāma have tended to reduce, edit, or excise sections of the Uttarakāṇḍa or even the entire book itself. Some readers have even argued that the book is a spurious appendage to the true Rāmāyaṇa and that it should not be considered a part of the poem at all. ...

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6. The Problem of the Uttarakāṇḍa

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pp. 74-81

Since at least the time of Hermann Jacobi,1 Rāmāyaṇa scholars—with a few exceptions—have argued that the Uttarakāṇḍa of the Vālmīki Rāmāyaṇa, much like considerable portions of its Bālakāṇḍa, is distinctly of later composition than the bulk of the intervening five books of the poem as it has come down to us. ...

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7. The Controversial Episodes: The Uttarakāṇḍa and Its Critics

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pp. 82-113

No study of the Uttarakāṇḍa would be complete without addressing two critical episodes in its account of the later years of Rāma, the Sītātyāga, “the abandonment of Sītā,” and the Śambūkavadha, “the slaying of Śambūka.” These events have significantly shaped the receptive history of the book and, indeed, the entire epic from at least the medieval period. ...

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8. The Structure of the Uttarakāṇḍa

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pp. 114-156

As noted above, the Uttarakāṇḍa, like the Bālakāṇḍa, is commonly understood to be a late or spurious book consisting of an eclectic collection of “virtually independent episodes.”1 For this reason, the kāṇḍa has suffered neglect on the part of many scholars. Moreover, the vast majority of scholarship that has been directed toward the kāṇḍa has been focused on specific references that support larger examinations of comparative dating, ...

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9. Historicity and Sovereignty in the Uttarakāṇḍa

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pp. 157-168

Anyone who possesses even the most passing familiarity with the story of the Rāmāyaṇa in virtually any of its innumerable renderings throughout South and Southeast Asia must know that central to the epic narrative is the great war at Lan̄kā described in enormous detail in the Yuddhakāṇḍa, by far the largest book of the Vālmīki Rāmāyaṇa. ...

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10. The Theology of the Uttarakāṇḍa

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pp. 169-186

The account of the incarnation, or avatāra, literally, the descent, of the Supreme Deity Lord Viṣṇu as the warrior prince and dharmic king Rāma as it is narrated in the Bālakāṇḍa is widely known. The process and outcome of the Lord’s human birth are clearly stated and easily grasped.1 ...

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11. The Rāmāyaṇa and the Gāyatrīmantra

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pp. 187-198

As we have been observing in our annotations throughout the previous volumes of this translation, there is a well-established tradition among some of the epic’s receptive communities that the text of the poem is both physically and spiritually a grand expansion and exposition of the famous and widely revered and recited ṛc, Ṛgveda 3.62.10,1 invoking the solar divinity Savitṛ. ...

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12. The Text, Commentaries, and Translations of the Uttarakāṇḍa

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pp. 199-222

Our objective over the course of this project has been to translate the critical edition of the Vālmīki Rāmāyaṇa, published by the Oriental Institute, Baroda, between 1960 and 1975. While a thorough discussion of the critical edition has been given in our general introduction to the Bālakāṇḍa and need not be repeated here,1 ...

Part II. Uttarakāṇḍa

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pp. 223-442

Part III. Notes

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pp. 443-1284

The Prakṣipta Sargas

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pp. 1285-1402

Genealogy of the Rākṣasas

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pp. 1403-1406

Glossary of Important Sanskrit Words, Proper Nouns, and Epithets

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pp. 1407-1410

Emendations and Corrections of the Critical Edition

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pp. 1411-1412

Bibliography of Works Consulted

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pp. 1413-1434

Index

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pp. 1435-1522