Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright Page

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-iv

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. v-vi

List of Illustrations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

read more

Introduction: Collaborative Innovation in the Public Sector

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-24

WHILE GOVERNMENTS AIM to promote large-scale social and economic reforms from the top down, local administrative agencies and frontline staff members try to renew the public sector from below. Two examples related to the attempt to curb gang-related violence in large cities illustrate this bottom-up transformation process.

In Oakland, California, the city discovered that it often took several weeks before at-risk youths leaving the Juvenile Justice Hall reentered the public school system. During the interim, many of them became re-involved with the gang-related activities that had brought them into the...

read more

1 Defining and Contextualizing Innovation in the Public Sector

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 25-48

THIS CHAPTER sets the stage for studying collaborative innovation in the public sector. The first step shows that we need a concept of innovation that helps us distinguish between different kinds of change, transformation, and development. The second step involves defining the concept of innovation and providing examples of different types of public innovation. The third step explains the growing interest in public innovation and justifies the need for a new public innovation agenda that both researchers and practitioners should pursue. The chapter concludes with a few cautious remarks about the role and...

read more

2 Collaborative Interaction as a Source of Public Innovation

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 49-74

THIS CHAPTER argues that multi-actor collaboration is a crucial and yet relatively unexplored source of innovation in the public sector. In the private sector, competition rather than collaboration is often considered as the key source of economic innovation (Porter 1985). Competition forces private businesses to reduce their costs by introducing new technologies, more efficient production processes, or new and cheaper raw materials, and it prompts them to increase their sales by developing new products and marketing techniques. The reward for winning the competitive innovation battle with other private enterprises might be growing profits, increasing market shares, and perhaps...

read more

3 Toward a Theory of Collaborative Innovation

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 75-108

DESPITE THE URGENT NEED for innovative solutions in public policy, organizations, and service production, the study of public innovation is a relatively new and undeveloped endeavor, and the study of collaborative efforts to spur innovation in the public sector is even less developed. Empirical studies and experiences suggest that networked collaboration contributes to the enhancement of public innovation, but they also point to limits and constraints of collaborative innovation (Ansell and Torfing 2014). Nevertheless, there are very few theoretically informed studies of the processes, outcomes, and conditions of...

read more

4 Triggering Innovation and Collaboration

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 109-129

A LARGE NUMBER of public policies, organizations, and ser v ices tend to be fairly stable and experience very little change over time. The stability of the public sector is positive insofar as it creates a high degree of predictability and security for citizens, private firms, and other stakeholders. Welfare recipients can safely rely on getting the same benefits and services tomorrow as they received yesterday, and private contractors can plan ahead, knowing that they will provide the same kind of garbage collection and hospital cleaning in coming years. In some areas, such as the regulation of traffic, the control of nuclear power plants, and the taxation of pension schemes, we would consider experimental changes and rapid reforms as unwelcome and perhaps even dangerous (Mulgan 2007, 5)....

read more

5 Mobilizing and Empowering Actors and Institutionalizing Interaction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 130-152

WHEN THE momentum for collaborative innovation is created, a plurality of actors with different ideas and competences must be mobilized and empowered, and their interaction must be institutionalized to facilitate mutual learning and collaborative innovation. To illustrate, when the government asks the police force to find new and innovative solutions to address the rising problems of gang-related crime, the force may want to initiate a collaborative process to enhance its limited cognitive and ideational capacity for designing and implementing new measures. It must recruit and motivate a number of relevant and affected actors and institutionalize the process of interaction to create a stable process of collaboration that can facilitate cognitive and ideational exchange....

read more

6 Enhancing Mutual, Expansive, and Transformative Learning

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 153-181

THE COLLABORATIVE EFFORT to enhance public innovation involves a plurality of public and private actors who hold different assumptions, views, and interests that inform their individual and joint attempts to solve urgent problems, respond to future challenges, and exploit emerging opportunities. In the process of collaboration, the actors advance and discuss their differing views, assumptions, and ideas. If the interaction is constructive and conflicts are successfully mediated, then they will be able to reach a common understanding of the issues at stake, one that can serve as the basis for envisioning different solutions and strategies. Iterative rounds of analysis, idea generation,...

read more

7 Making and Implementing Bold and Creative Decisions

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 182-208

MUTUAL LEARNING makes actors engaged in collaborative problem solving wiser. Further, it broadens and revises the knowledge base that actors can draw upon when they seek to craft innovative solutions to wicked and unruly problems. Expansive and transformative learning problematizes tacit and taken-for-granted knowledge and utilizes metaphors that stimulate creative problem solving. As a result, collaborative processes that stimulate this kind of learning generate a number of new and creative ideas and solutions. Unfortunately, many problem-driven search processes in the public sector stop here and fail to do the hard work of singling out the most promising solution and...

read more

8 Diffusing Public Innovation through Collaborative Networks

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 209-236

GRANOVETTER’S (1973) seminal work has convincingly demonstrated the strength of weak ties when it comes to spreading new ideas and solutions between social actors and within and across public and private organizations. For example, if an ambulance service in Stockholm seeks an innovative way of reducing its response time to life-threatening calls, it may benefit from looking outside its immediate surroundings and drawing on the experiences of another ambulance service. A Swedish staff member attending an international conference for medical response teams may have heard about a British ambulance service in the West Midlands that had put its paramedics on motorbikes. Chasing down the speaker from the conference will prove more...

read more

9 Enhancing Collaborative Innovation through Leadership and Management

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 237-262

COLLABORATIVE INNOVATION is shorthand for innovation processes that are facilitated and accelerated by multi-actor collaboration. In other words, the notion of collaborative innovation refers to a causal relation between collaboration and innovation. In the previous chapters, we have seen how collaboration between public and private actors can help define and frame problems, challenges, and opportunities that call for innovative solutions; how relevant and affected actors can be mobilized and empowered in institutional arenas of interaction that facilitate expansive and transformative learning processes; how decisions to realize bold, creative, and promising ideas can be made and implemented in practice through multi-actor collaboration; and, finally, how the diffusion of innovative ideas and solutions depends on networked collaboration between suppliers and potential adopters of innovative solutions....

read more

10 Reforming Public Governance, Enhancing Collaborative Innovation

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 263-287

PRESSURE IS GROWING on public organizations to spur policy and service innovation so they can solve complex problems, break policy deadlocks, and satisfy unmet social needs. Public organizations are also encouraged to change their organizational designs, exploit new digital technologies, and rethink their relation to citizens and private stakeholders in order to enhance productivity and mobilize resources in times of shrinking budgets. As we have seen, public innovation can benefit tremendously from collaboration across organizations and sectors. The big question then becomes how to organize, govern, and manage public sector organizations to further accelerate public innovation in general and collaborative innovation in particular. Answering this pertinent question brings us into the realm of public administration policy in...

read more

Conclusion: Summary Propositions about Collaborative Innovation

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 288-310

THIS BOOK has sought to open a new avenue for cross-disciplinary social science research by making two major claims: A persistent and systematic endeavor to enhance innovation may help the public sector do more and better with less, and collaboration between multiple actors inside and outside of government constitutes a key driver of public innovation. The hope is that academic scholars, postgraduate students, and practitioners in and around the public sector will take on the challenge of exploring further the ways that collaboration can be spurred and harnessed to create new and innovative solutions that can improve public services, break policy deadlocks, and make organizations and delivery systems more efficient. Perhaps they can even rethink the role of the public sector so that it can develop new and better...

References

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 311-340

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 341-352

About the Author

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. 353