Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-x

ThiS Book haS itS oriGinS in Zurich, where on a cold December day several years ago, I had a couple of drinks with Harvard’s Sven Beckert. Sven asked me if I was interested in writing a book for a series that he had recently set up with Jeremi Suri. Sven settled the bill. I felt that I had to pay him back...

Abbreviations

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pp. xi-xiv

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Prologue

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pp. xv-xxiii

Franklin Delano RooSevelt hated flyinG. Having traveled to Europe by ship frequently during his childhood, he spent almost all his prewar presidency either in Washington, DC, on his beloved family estate in Hyde Park, NY, or crisscrossing the United States by train, ship, and car. Rarely did he...

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1. A Global Crisis

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pp. 24-58

“In the large view, we have reached a higher degree of comfort and security than ever existed before in the history of the world.”1 Herbert Hoover’s inaugural address very much summarizes the spirit in America in spring 1929. Also in 1929, journalist Charles Merz proclaimed that a “brand-new America...

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2. In Search of New Beginnings

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pp. 59-134

The Great Depression was not just a crisis of capitalism and laissez-faire more specifically but also of existing political orders. Liberal democracy in particular saw itself in retreat, and some already heard its knell. At the level of political ideas, British political theorist Michael Oakeshott noted at the...

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3. Into the Vast External Realm

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pp. 135-203

Early New Deal action largely concentrated on domestic intervention. While Hoover had mainly blamed the outside world for the Depression, his successor was acutely aware of the structural difficulties and institutional inadequacies within the United States that had deepened and, to some extent...

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4. Redefining Boundaries

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pp. 204-274

Even if the sense of utter crisis and emergency had receded, the New Deal of the mid- 1930s was still awash in ideas and initiatives. Roosevelt and his entourage continued to see government as the remedy for the structural problems of modern industrial capitalism. State action building on domestic...

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5. The American World Order

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pp. 275-314

In the long global perspective, the New Deal had many lives—and died just about as many deaths. It received its first blow in late 1937, when the momentum of domestic reform petered out. The outbreak of World War II less than two years later seemed to announce its death still louder, and overall...

Notes

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pp. 315-364

Bibliography

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pp. 365-428

Index

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pp. 429-452