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Three Shots at Prevention
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In 2007, Texas governor Rick Perry issued an executive order requiring that all females entering sixth grade be vaccinated against the human papillomavirus (HPV), igniting national debate that echoed arguments heard across the globe over public policy, sexual health, and the politics of vaccination. Three Shots at Prevention explores the contentious disputes surrounding the controversial vaccine intended to protect against HPV, the most common sexually transmitted infection. When the HPV vaccine first came to the market in 2006, religious conservatives decried the government's approval of the vaccine as implicitly sanctioning teen sex and encouraging promiscuity while advocates applauded its potential to prevent 4,000 cervical cancer deaths in the United States each year. Families worried that laws requiring vaccination reached too far into their private lives. Public health officials wrestled with concerns over whether the drug was too new to be required and whether opposition to it could endanger support for other, widely accepted vaccinations. Many people questioned the aggressive marketing campaigns of the vaccine's creator, Merck & Co. And, since HPV causes cancers of the cervix, vulva, vagina, penis, and anus, why was the vaccine recommended only for females? What did this reveal about gender and sexual politics in the United States? With hundreds of thousands of HPV-related cancer deaths worldwide, how did similar national debates in Europe and the developing world shape the global possibilities of cancer prevention? This volume provides insight into the deep moral, ethical, and scientific questions that must be addressed when sexual and social politics confront public health initiatives in the United States and around the world.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Title Page, Copyright
  2. p. iii
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vii
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  1. Acknowledgments
  2. pp. ix-x
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  1. Introduction: A Cancer Vaccine for Girls? HPV, Sexuality, and the New Politics of Prevention
  2. pp. xi-xviii
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  1. Vaccine Time Lines
  2. pp. xix-xxx
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  1. Part I / The Knownand the Unknown: Vaccination Decisions amid Risk and Uncertainty
  2. p. 1
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  1. Chapter One. The Coercive Hand,the Beneficent Hand: What the History of Compulsory Vaccination Can Tell Usabout HPV Vaccine Mandates
  2. pp. 3-20
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  1. Chapter Two. Gardasil: A Vaccine against Cancer and a Drug to Reduce Risk
  2. pp. 21-38
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  1. Chapter Three. HPV Vaccination Campaigns: Masking Uncertainty, Erasing Complexity
  2. pp. 39-60
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  1. Chapter Four. The Great Undiscussable: Anal Cancer, HPV, and Gay Men’s Health
  2. pp. 61-90
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  1. Chapter Five. Cervical Cancer, HIV, and the HPV Vaccine in Botswana
  2. pp. 91-100
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  1. Part II / Girls at the Center of the Storm: Marketing and Managing Gendered Risk
  2. p. 101
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  1. Chapter Six. Safeguarding Girls: Morality, Risk, and Activism
  2. pp. 103-120
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  1. Chapter Seven. Producing and Protecting: Risky GirlhoodsLaura Mamo, Amber Nelson, and Aleia Clark
  2. pp. 121-145
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  1. Chapter Eight. Re-Presenting ChoiceTune in HPV
  2. pp. 146-162
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  1. Part III / Focus on the Family: Parents Assessing Morality, Risk, and Opting Out
  2. p. 163
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  1. Chapter Nine. Parenting and Prevention: Views of HPV Vaccines among Parents Challenging Childhood Immunizations
  2. pp. 165-181
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  1. Chapter Ten. Decision Psychology and the HPV Vaccine
  2. pp. 182-195
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  1. Chapter Eleven. Nonmedical Exemptions to Mandatory Vaccination: Personal Belief, Public Policy, and the Ethics of Refusal
  2. pp. 196-212
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  1. Chapter Twelve. Sex, Science, and the Politics of Biomedicine: Gardasil in Comparative Perspective
  2. pp. 213-228
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  1. Part IV / In Search of Good Government: Europe, Africa, and America at the Crossroads of Cancer Prevention
  2. p. 229
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  1. Chapter Thirteen. Vaccination as Governance: HPV Skepticism in the United States and Africa, and the North-South Divide
  2. pp. 231-253
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  1. Chapter Fourteen. Public Discourses and Policymaking: The HPV Vaccination from the European Perspective
  2. pp. 254-269
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  1. Chapter Fifteen. HPV Vaccination in Context: A View from France
  2. pp. 270-292
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  1. Conclusion. Individualized Risk and Public Health: Medical Perils, Political Pathways, and the Cultural Framing of Vaccination under the Shadow of Sexuality
  2. pp. 293-302
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 303-307
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 309-320
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