Cover

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Half Title, Publisher Page, Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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From the Dean

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pp. vii-viii

In the summer of 1997, at the edge of the twenty-first century, I gathered a group of indigenous educators from Aotearoa, Australia, Hawai‘i, Alaska, and North America to share ancestral knowledge and best practices for the education of indigenous children and youth. We met together at Sol y Sombra Ranch in Santa Fe, New Mexico. ...

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Editors’ Note

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pp. ix-xiv

To capture the ‘ano (character, condition) of Kanaka ‘Ōiwi Methodologies: Mo‘olelo and Metaphor, we begin this volume on Kanaka ‘Ōiwi research methodologies1 with verses from Trask’s poem, “Into Our Light I Will Go Forever.” Her seemingly somber words evoke the grounded yet hopeful and adventurous knowledge-seeking spirit of our seafaring kūpuna (ancestors) ...

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A Note on the Cover Art

Haley Kailiehu

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pp. xv-xvi

“Uncovering the Layers Within Us” is a piece I painted to reflect on and forever remember a special experience I shared with my kāne, No‘eau, and two friends as we journeyed to Waiau on the summit of Mauna a Wākea. Consciously and subconsciously, we were all there seeking something: ...

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Reproducing the Ropes of Resistance: Hawaiian Studies Methodologies

Noelani Goodyear-Ka‘ōpua

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pp. 1-29

Engaging in academic research and writing can mean spending a lot of time alone in archives, in labs, in libraries, in “the field,” and often in front of computers. But as the great physician, health researcher, and Hawaiian independence advocate, Kekuni Akana Blaisdell, once said, “Our ancestors are always with us as long as we think of them, ...

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Ua Noho Au A Kupa I Ke Alo

R. Keawe Lopes Jr.

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pp. 30-41

“Kaniakapupu Song,” more popularly known today as “Ua Noho Au A Kupa I Ke Alo,” was composed by “Figg,”1 a pseudonym for King David Kalākaua, who ruled the kingdom of Hawai‘i from 1874 to 1891. Most credit the song’s popularity to its beautiful melody line and to the unforgettable musicians who have recorded and thus preserved it throughout the years. ...

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He Lei Aloha ‘Āina

Mehana Blaich Vaughan

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pp. 42-52

Throughout Hawai‘i, lei symbolize certain places and show that the wearer has experienced them. Lei offer a way to see and know a landscape because each lei is unique to the place where it is made. Like the process of making lei, my research in the field of environmental studies seeks to gather a variety of materials and put them together in stories that build knowledge and ways of seeing certain ‘āina. ...

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Mo‘olelo for Transformative Leadership: Lessons from Engaged Practice

Kaiwipunikauikawēkiu Lipe

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pp. 53-71

Aloha nui kāua e ka mea heluhelu! (Greetings, dear reader). I would like to set the stage for this chapter by stating that I recently earned my PhD in education administration from the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa (UHM), a predominantly non-Hawaiian institution (Balutski and Wright 2012).1 ...

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Ka Wai Ola: The Life-Sustaining Water of Kanaka Knowledge

Katrina-Ann R. Kapā‘anaokalāokeola Nākoa Oliveira

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pp. 72-85

It was a bright sunny summer day in Kahakuloa, Maui. Off in the distance the mountains were overcast, but the sky was not noticeably dark or heavy with rain. Kahakuloa was bustling with activity and the sound of ‘ōlelo Hawai‘i (Hawaiian language) echoed throughout the valley as nearly thirty participants from Mauiakama, ...

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Ka ‘Ikena a ka Hawai‘i: Toward a Kanaka ‘Ōiwi Critical Race Theory

Erin Kahunawaika‘ala Wright, Brandi Jean Nālani Balutski

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pp. 86-108

The ways in which we have conducted research have been guided by this principle, “ma ka hana ka ‘ike”: In doing work, there is knowledge. This principle reflects our kūpuna’s (elders, ancestors) infinite wisdom in truly understanding that careful observation, practice, and reflection are integral to refining praxis. ...

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He Ala Nihinihi Ia A Hiki I Ka Mole: A Precarious Yet Worthwhile Path to Kuleana Through Hawaiian Place-Based Education

Maya L. Kawailanaokeawaiki Saffery

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pp. 109-135

Preserving and then passing down living narratives from one generation to the next have been part of our tradition as Kānaka since our origins. Whether they take the form of mele (poetry, songs, chants) composed and performed, or of mo‘olelo (stories, histories) told and retold first orally and then in written form, ...

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Nā ‘Ili‘ili

Brandy Nālani McDougall

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pp. 136-141

The young kahu was unloading one of his last boxes in the back office, when he saw a small fist rapping at one of the windows and heard a frantic young voice calling for him: “Kaaaahuuuuu! Kaaaahuuuu! Come help! We need help!” ...

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Arriving at an ‘Āina Aloha Research Framework: What Is Our Kuleana as the Next Generation of ‘Ōiwi Scholars?

Summer Puanani Maunakea

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pp. 142-160

I would like to acknowledge and thank Drs. Davianna Pōmaika‘i McGregor and Jonathan Kay Kamakawiwo‘ole Osorio. I had the pleasure of interviewing these scholars as they helped me describe and construct what I understand to be research methodology rooted in ‘ike kupuna—ancestral knowledge. ...

Contributors

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pp. 161-164

Series Page

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