In this Book

In Deference to the Other
summary
In Deference to the Other brings contemporary continental thought into conversation with that of Bernard Lonergan (1904–1984), the Jesuit philosopher and theologian. This is an opportune moment to open such a dialogue: philosophers and theologians indebted to Lonergan have increasingly found themselves challenged by the insights of thinkers typically dubbed “postmodern,” while postmodernists, most notably Jacques Derrida, have begun to ask the “God question.” While Lonergan was not a continental philosopher, neither was he an analytic philosopher. Concerned with both epistemology and cognition, his systematic and hermeneutic-like proposals resonate with the concerns of philosophers such as Derrida, Foucault, Levinas, and Kristeva. Contributors to this volume find insight and affiliation between Lonergan’s thought and contemporary continental thought in a wide-ranging work that engages the philosophical problems of authenticity, self-appropriation, ethics, and the human subject.

Table of Contents

  1. Cover
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  1. Frontmatter
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  1. In Deference to the Other
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  1. Contents
  2. pp. v-vi
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  1. Foreword
  2. pp. vii-xiii
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  1. Introduction
  2. pp. 1-12
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  1. 1. Decentering Inwardness
  2. pp. 13-32
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  1. 2. To Whom Do We Return in the Turn to the Subject? Lonergan, Derrida, and Foucault Revisited
  2. pp. 33-52
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  1. 3. Self-Appropriation: Lonergan’s Pearl of Great Price
  2. pp. 53-64
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  1. 4. Subject for the Other: Lonergan and Levinas on Being Human in Postmodernity
  2. pp. 65-90
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  1. 5. Kristeva’s Horror and Lonergan’s Insight: The Psychic Structure of the Human Person and the Move to a Higher Viewpoint
  2. pp. 91-106
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  1. 6. Lonergan’s Postmodern Subject: Neither Neoscholastic Substance nor Cartesian Ego
  2. pp. 107-120
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  1. 7. In Response to the Other: Postmodernity and Critical Realism
  2. pp. 121-140
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  1. 8. Lonergan and the Ambiguity of Postmodern Laughter
  2. pp. 141-164
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  1. Works Cited
  2. pp. 165-174
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  1. Contributors
  2. pp. 175-176
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  1. Index
  2. pp. 177-187
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