Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. i-vi

CONTENTS

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-x

read more

INTRODUCTION Two Faces of Justice

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-8

In 1875 Connecticut had one prison (built in 1829), ten county jails (some of which dated back more than a century), and a board of pardons under the governor’s direction. The state’s county courts had been abolished in 1855 in favor of stronger superior courts. Court business increased after the end of the Civil War, and courts of common pleas were established to deal with less serious legal issues. Not all Connecticut...

read more

ONE Connecticut’s Cultural Context, 1875

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 9-42

In 1969 I had an interview with a twenty-six-year-old man named Paul. He spoke fairly good English, although Spanish was his native tongue. He was articulate but not the con-artist type I would meet many times in the future. He was in for manslaughter. I didn’t ask what the occasion of his crime was. That wasn’t my style, but he revealed it anyway. He had been drinking one evening, he explained without much elaboration, with his...

read more

TWO From Newgate Prison to Wethersfield State Prison, 1775–1875

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 43-74

One of the unique experiences that helped mold my views on criminal justice was the opportunity in the mid eighties to participate in a mock imprisonment at the former Haddam State Jail, a facility that the Department of Correction used as a training site. Along with twenty or so guard recruits, I was fingerprinted late one Thursday afternoon and booked into the old jail as an inmate. Each of us was given a uniform to wear for the next...

read more

THREE Rehabilitation Rekindled, 1875–1910

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 75-118

On one of my early visits as a prison volunteer in the mid-1960s, I brought with me, at my new friend’s request, a small pocket book of sermons by Dr. Martin Luther King. I stood in line, and when it was my turn to be checked out by the gatehouse guard, I gave him the name of the inmate I was visiting and my name. (I had decided to stop calling myself Reverend Bates to initiate more honest conversations.) When all my credentials matched...

read more

FOUR Continuity and Regression, 1910–1933

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 119-166

Every year, at the CPA’s annual meeting, various programs give out awards to corporations, businesses, individuals, and groups that have supported the agency’s efforts. Awards and recognitions of various kinds are also given out to offenders and ex-offenders who have participated in CPA programs. One such acknowledgement was given to a woman ex-offender who had spent over twenty years in prison but who, over a period of...

read more

FIVE Reform during the Maltbie Era, 1933–1960

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 167-215

During presentations to churches or civic organizations in the 1970s, I usually described how I had come to be a prison volunteer. My story, meant to generate a little humor, recounts how Merrill Austin, a Simsbury architect and the president of the CPA, had explained the program to my congregation. At his conclusion, he had asked for male volunteers, and to demonstrate my enormous gift of leadership, I raised my hand. I looked around...

read more

SIX The Culmination of Progressive Reform, 1960–1970

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 216-267

Because I worked in jails and prisons and was an ordained minister, most people put two and two together and conclude that I was a chaplain of some sort. Indeed, I admire chaplains and often wondered what it would be like to have a chaplain’s experience. I found out one time in the seventies, when I was called by the chaplain at the Morgan Street Jail in Hartford to substitute for him at a morning worship service. When I arrived, the...

read more

SEVEN Rehabilitation’s Last Hurrah, 1970–1980

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 268-336

It was at the Special Olympics one year that I personally saw the emotional impact community-service projects had on the volunteer offenders who participated from the Alternative Incarceration Centers. I was wandering around the area where the track and field competitions were being held. I happened to stand by one of our CPA volunteers, whose job was to be available if anyone fell or needed assistance....

read more

EIGHT The Return of Retributive Justice, 1980–1990

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 337-387

The Time Out for You program was one of the few times in which I got close and personal with correctional officers outside of the workplace. TOFU was designed to be a wake-up call to correctional officers, a few hours in which they could assess calmly what effect the prison culture was having on them physically and emotionally. I remember, especially, having a conversation with some of the correctional officers about...

read more

NINE The Legacies of Retribution, 1990–2000

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 388-430

I’m often asked if I was ever afraid when I went inside the prisons and jails. My answer is always the same: very seldom. For several reasons fear was not a major part of my reaction to prisons, jails, inmates, or any other aspect of my work in criminal justice. One was the very ordinariness of most inmates. Also, I tried my best to follow official precautions and be a nonthreatening presence to both guards and inmates. My approach was...

read more

EPILOGUE Five Critical Questions

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 431-452

This epilogue is intended to accomplish two ends. One is to summarize some of the main discoveries that arise from my experiences with the Connecticut Prison Association and my subsequent research. The second is to indicate some of the developments that have taken place in the first fifteen years of the new century. My desire is to entice the reader to think about the direction and character of criminal...

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 453-454

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 455-478

References

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 479-488

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 489-510

Image Plates

pdf iconDownload PDF