Title Page, Series Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-x

I am grateful beyond words to the many who helped make this book possible. A 2012–2013 research leave from Wellesley College gave me the essential ingredient of time for this project, and the College’s generous faculty research and conference travel grants are much appreciated. The Women’s and Gender...

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Introduction

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pp. 1-6

This book expands the familiar ethical claim that health care is a social good, typically understood to mean that health care is a societal or national good. But “social” is a multilayered term, and Communities of Health Care Justice centers on the underappreciated notion that health care is also a community good...

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1. Health Care as a Community Good

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pp. 7-22

How we—any of us—understand justice in health care rests in large measure on how we understand health care. What sort of good is health care? In the twenty-first-century United States, health care is framed in multiple and sometimes overlapping ways: Health care is a social good, public work, and civic...

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2. Communities Obscured. Liberal Theories of Health Care Justice

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pp. 23-38

Generally speaking, liberal theories of justice in health care guide normative relations between individuals and society, as they center on individuals and society as the justice-relevant moral entities. Despite the multiple and important roles that diverse communities play in health and health care, these theories...

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3. Communities Constrained. A Liberal Communitarian View

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pp. 39-54

Not all theories of health justice neglect communities or understand them as impediments to justice. Ezekiel Emanuel’s liberal communitarian vision of health justice, for example, places multiple and diverse communities at the center of just health care.1 Justice, says Emanuel, is the fair allocation of medical...

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4. Community Justice

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pp. 55-78

A common starting point for considerations of justice in health care is a narrative about an individual’s experiences of health care injustice. As such, it would be fitting to begin this chapter about community justice in health care with a story about injustices related to a person’s belonging to a particular community...

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5. Community Justice in U.S. Health Policy

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pp. 79-98

Communities have had long and significant roles in U.S. health policy. In the tellingly titled article “Paradigms Lost: The Persisting Search for Community in U.S. Health Policy,” Mark Schlesinger tracks the shifting roles of geographic communities in health care and health policy since the mid-1600s.1 Over time...

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Conclusion

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pp. 99-104

Health care as a community good is a health policy reality, and communities are necessary moral participants in theories of justice for health care. Community health centers, hospital community needs assessments, and community-based advocacy groups are among the more substantial and apparent expressions...

Notes

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pp. 105-124

Bibliography

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pp. 125-136

Index

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pp. 137-142

About the Author

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pp. 143-144

Available titles in the Critical Issues in Health and Medicine series

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pp. 145-147