Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

List of Illustrations

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pp. vii-x

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Introduction: Literacy by Subscription

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pp. 1-22

In 1900, 238,000 persons were enrolled in college courses in the United States. Three years later, a single magazine, the Ladies’ Home Journal, could claim 1 million subscribers and even more readers. At the dawn of the twentieth century, in the midst of a literacy crisis that has received a...

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1. Literacy Identities: Defining Magazine Writers

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pp. 23-48

A contributor to the 1844 Maine Farmer, complaining of the inadequate education offered in schools, explained that it was important for teachers to account for and incorporate the skills and experiences of their students, as they “must know how to adapt [their] instructions to the several capacities and circumstances of [their] scholars” (“For the Farmer” 1)....

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2. Buying and Selling Literacy: The Ladies’ Home Journal

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pp. 49-82

Created by the same editors who would also produce the Saturday Evening Post, the Ladies’ Home Journal was one of the most widely read and influential magazines of the early twentieth century, in no small part due to the magazine’s advertising success in marketing both itself and its sponsors. The scholarly history of the magazine has, for the most part, not...

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3. Joining the Club: Clubwomen, Magazine Readers, and Scholars

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pp. 83-118

In her autobiography, Margaret Sangster, editor of Harper’s Bazar from 1889 to 1899, notes that even in its early years the fashion magazine “had a pervasive literary flavour from the first to the last page” (207). Although Harper’s Bazar, founded in 1867, was predominantly a fashion magazine...

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4. Special Invitation to Write: Magazine Readers as Contributors

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pp. 119-150

n an article simply titled “Farm Experience” in the November 1880 issue of the Ohio Farmer, the editor reminds readers of his “standing invitation” for them to contribute to any and all departments in the magazine. He recognizes, however, that his audience now consists of thousands of readers “who have never had a special invitation to write” (293). The Ohio Farmer...

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Conclusion: Subscribing to a Professional Writing Community

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pp. 151-168

I argued in the introduction that magazines deserve attention in literacy and composition studies because of their wide circulation and their presence in the lives of a population larger and more diverse than that visible in college classrooms. I argued that periodicals, especially women’s magazines and farm journals, sought to supplement the literacy education provided in...

Notes

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pp. 169-174

Works Cited

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pp. 175-188

Index

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pp. 189-198

About the Author

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p. 199

Back Cover

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p. 200