Half Title, Series Page, Title Page, Copyright

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. iv-v

List of Illustrations

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. vi

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

p. vii

First of all, I owe the Wellcome Trust a world of gratitude for its kind and generous support of my doctoral research that eventually led to this book. But I am eternally indebted to my beloved wife Sabine, whose obviously boundless patience with an increasingly erratic husband has never failed to amaze me. ...

List of Abbreviations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

read more

Introduction

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-28

The post-Versailles reshuffle of Eastern Europe’s borders signified the onset of a new era in the relationship between minorities and host nations, old and new alike. It marked the beginning of an interwar period awash with homogenizing nation-building projects that sought meaning and purpose in the new geopolitical realities that fostered them. ...

read more

Chapter I. Locating and Defining the Transylvanian Saxon Eugenic Discourse

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 29-84

Who were the key protagonists of the Saxon eugenic discourse as it emerged and evolved into its Gleichschaltung in 1940, how did they define the dysgenic crisis, and how did they seek to alleviate it? Saxon eugenics always revolved around the twin themes of Lebensraum and a looming demographic collapse, but they were weighted differently by different actors. ...

read more

Chapter II. Assessing the Dysgenic Crisis: Key Concepts and Theses in Alfred Csallner’s Definition of Saxon Degeneration

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 85-120

Csallner featured heavily in the elaboration of the core conceptual issues of Saxon eugenics: demography and differential fertility; Lebensraum and the loss thereof; and the host of socioeconomic factors aggravating both, including emigration, mixed marriages, and the economic losses incurred by employing non-Saxons, or by wasting national funds on alcohol and tobacco. ...

read more

Chapter III. Alfred Csallner in Search of Eugenic Solutions and Institutional Means

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 121-164

What measures did Alfred Csallner propose to counter this unfolding dysgenic crisis, by what means did he hope to translate them into reality, how were they going to be executed, and, critically, by whom? Apart from his efforts to enlighten and awaken the masses to their national race-hygienic duties through lectures, workshops, work groups, and other private initiatives, ...

read more

Chapter IV. Fascist Visions of a Eugenic Fortress: The Self-Help’s Origins and Rise to Power, 1922–33

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 165-202

Fritz Fabritius was to leave Saxon historiography with one of its most ideologically complex and polemically convoluted legacies by the time of his death aged seventy-four, on October 20, 1957, in Prien, near Hamburg. If Heinrich Siegmund had stood at the forefront of a budding eugenic discourse, and Alfred Csallner characterized its maturation into a political ideology in waiting, ...

read more

Chapter V. Saxon Fascism in Power, 1933–40

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 203-240

The NSDR’s astonishing ability to impose its national program had a profoundly symbolic function in marking, as the Self-Help’s organs had so frequently quoted Fabritius insisting, the beginning of a new age, of an entirely new understanding of national identity.1 But it was also only the first of three political victories that the NSDR enjoyed in rapid succession. ...

read more

Chapter VI. 1940 and Everything After

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 241-254

The year 1940 was a cataclysmic one, ending Saxon eugenics’ second (or interwar) period under the aegis of Siegmund, Csallner, and Schunn, and ushering in a third one, defined by the German minorities’ Gleichschaltung with the Third Reich’s needs and wants. This watershed, very appropriately, came in the form of Andreas Schmidt—Gottlieb Berger’s son-in-law— ...

read more

Conclusions

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 255-258

This study sought to unpack how and why a eugenic discourse that had emerged under Heinrich Siegmund’s tutelage in the early twentieth century was radicalized, politicized, and institutionalized through Alfred Csallner and the Self-Help during the interwar period. ...

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 259-276

Index of Names

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 277-278

Index of Places

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 279-280