Cover

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Title Page, Copyright Page

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pp. i-viii

Contents

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pp. ix-xii

List of Illustrations

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pp. xiii-xiv

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xv-xviii

The Center for Henry James Studies at Creighton University, grants from the Gilbert C. Swanson Foundation, Inc., the College of the Liberal Arts and Department of English, The Pennsylvania State University, a Fellowship for College Teachers and Independent Scholars from the National Endowment for the Humanities, a Sabbatical Fellowship from the American Philosophical Society, Mellon Fellowships to the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas at Austin, a fellowship from the Bibliographical Society of America, and a Lester J. Cappon Fellowship in Documentary Editing to the Newberry Library in Chicago contributed to this volume. Particular recognition must go to Pierre A. Walker, who, following the previous volume, stepped away from the edition. Pierre Walker’s work in one way or another will appear in most of the volumes in this edition, including this one. Many other individual contributions of time and money have contributed to making this volume possible....

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Introduction: A Finer Art

Susan M. Griffin

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pp. xix-xxxiv

On 6 June 1880 Henry James wrote several letters: one, accepting Louise Chandler Moulton’s invitation to visit; a second, telling his mother that he had returned to London from Italy and was anticipating his brother William’s arrival in London; and a third, sending the opening pages of The Portrait of a Lady to William Dean Howells for publication in the Atlantic Monthly. James’s epistolary efforts that day speak variously of his life at the time: his social life; his deep, though ambivalent, ties to family; and his professional negotiations.1
By 1880 Henry James had decided that Europe was to be his home. He was a popular guest at the London townhouses and country homes of the British, visiting, for example, the John Clarks at Falmouth in England and Tillypronie in Scotland. He formed what Alan G. James describes as “durable friendships” with Lord and Lady...

Symbols and Abbreviations

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pp. xxxv-xxxvi

Chronology

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pp. xxxvii-xlii

Errata

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pp. xliii-xlvi

1880

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pp. 1-2

June

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pp. 3-9

July

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pp. 10-32

August

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pp. 33-50

September

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pp. 51-64

October

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pp. 65-84

November

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pp. 84-112

December

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pp. 112-138

Image Plates

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1881

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pp. 139-140

January

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pp. 141-159

February

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pp. 160-183

March

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pp. 183-205

April

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pp. 206-210

May/June

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pp. 210-228

July

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pp. 228-243

August

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pp. 243-260

September

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pp. 260-273

October

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pp. 274-282

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Biographical Register

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pp. 283-296

This register is intended to help readers of The Complete Letters of Henry James keep track of the many people James mentions in his letters. It lists family members and friends and public, literary, and artistic figures of James’s era whom the editors consider now to be relatively obscure. Well- known people that James mentions—for instance, Dickens, George Eliot, Richard Wagner, Sarah Bernhardt—are omitted, as are canonical authors of James’s past, such as Shakespeare and Chaucer. Well- known contemporary authors and artists, such as Ivan Turgenev and Émile Zola, do appear in this register when the editors have deemed that they were significant to James’s life or work. Excluded from this register are the names of people James mentions whom we have been unable to identify....

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General Editors’ Note

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pp. 297-310

We intend The Complete Letters of Henry James to be as useful to as broad a range of readers as possible, given the limitations of print reproduction. Because one cannot anticipate what biographical or historical details or stylistic idiosyncrasies contained in any given letter may be of value to users of the edition, the general editors believe that our duty is “to be as complete as possible,” as James wrote in another context (“Art of Fiction” 408). By being as complete as possible, we enable the opportunity for study of any aspect of James’s letters. Such an inclusive edition of the letters enriches by its range and detail our understanding of James’s life and the lives of his correspondents, his use of language, his importance to our cultural legacy, and thus the value of the original letters themselves....

Works Cited

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pp. 311-320

Index

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pp. 321-345