Cover

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Half Title, Series Info, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Introduction

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pp. 1-64

“Come, come, my conservative friend, wipe the dew off your spectacles, and see that the world is moving.” With these words, at once inviting and patronizing, Elizabeth Cady Stanton introduced the two-volume Woman’s Bible (1895, 1898), critical commentaries on the bible’s treatment of women, compiled and penned by Stanton and a committee of female collaborators.1 ...

Chronology

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pp. 65-72

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“She Always Played to Win”: The Young Elizabeth Cady (1831–1922)

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pp. 73-79

In their 1922 memoir of their mother, Harriot Eaton Stanton Blatch (1856–1940) and Theodore Weld Stanton (1851–1925) characterized what was for them the unique significance of Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s early and late delight in dancing, music, and competitive games; that innate joy in artistry, physical activity, and spirited rivalry, they maintained, sharpened her activism. ...

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Seneca Falls and Early Reform Days (1880–1911)

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pp. 80-102

This chapter shows Stanton slowly acquiring the knowledge and confidence to participate in multiple reform movements. We see her speaking from the ranks of the audience, rather than from the stage, as she initiates her trademark weapon of scathing humor. ...

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Marriage and Maternity: The Public “Mother of the Gracchi” (1869–1888)

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pp. 103-122

The selections in this chapter document one of the more controversial and still highly relevant evolutions in Stanton’s activism, as well as the reception typically accorded her shrewd maternal self-presentation. The latest of these commentaries, remarks from Grace Greenwood (Sarah Jane Clarke Lippincott) at the 1888 “Conference of the Pioneers” session at the International Council of Women, may even indicate that by her seventies, ...

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Partnership of Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony (1885–1915)

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pp. 123-135

Stanton and Anthony forged their enduring bond within political and personal spheres. This unique feature of their relationship was nowhere more apparent than when Anthony spent weeks at a time in Tenafly; at such times the two women shared domestic and reformist labors. ...

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Schism (1868–1880)

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pp. 136-171

This chapter treats a controversial moment in Stanton’s life, one that produced a range of reactions from her contemporaries; in turn, that reception also contributed to the increasingly expansive directions of her advocacy. These selections reflect largely upon the events of 1867 through 1870; and the enormity of their emotional impact upon reformers as well as upon the general public is registered by their duration— ...

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The Woman’s Bible Controversy (1896)

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pp. 172-191

The selections in this chapter reflect upon Stanton’s late November 1895 publication of The Woman’s Bible and span a relatively brief period—between January and May 1896. Although the book generated great controversy, tangible and long-standing precedents for Stanton’s religious critique existed. In the 1880s the publication of a widely promoted (and then reviled) Revised New Testament (1881), ..

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Not “A Person of One Idea”: The Aging Radical (1884–1897)

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pp. 192-203

As the preceding chapter demonstrates, in her final decades Stanton’s activist vision could not be contained by NAWSA’s march toward women’s enfranchisement. The selections in “Not ‘A Person of One Idea’: The Aging Radical” detail that increasing scope. In her 1884 portrait, Laura Curtis Bullard (1831–1912) underscores Stanton’s continuing evolution as a reformer with an expansive social platform. ...

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Death and Legacy of Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1902–1903)

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pp. 204-220

On 22 November 1902, nearly a month after Stanton’s death, the “News and Comment” section of the Duluth News-Tribune declared, “The brain of Elizabeth Cady Stanton is causing controversy—even yet.” Helen Hamilton Gardener (1853–1925), whose tribute to Stanton the following year would also include an extended discussion of Stanton’s wish to be cremated after donating her brain to the Neurology Department at Cornell University, ...

Permissions

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pp. 221-222

Bibliography

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pp. 223-236

Index

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pp. 237-244

Further Series Titles

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