Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Acknowledgments

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pp. vii-viii

This book developed out of two seminars held in the Department of History and Classical Studies at Aarhus University on 26 September 2008 and 25 March 2011. On these occasions, six of the contributions were first presented in earlier versions (Beth Munro, Ine Jacobs, Nadin Burkhardt, Philip Kiernan, Benjamin Anderson, and Paolo Liverani). Ben Croxford, Troels Myrup Kristensen...

Introduction

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The Lives and Afterlives of Greek and Roman Sculpture: From Use to Refuse

Troels Myrup Kristensen, Lea Stirling

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pp. 1-24

As Leonard Barkan astutely observes in this quote from his book on the impact of archaeological finds on Renaissance aesthetics, almost no ancient statues have been preserved in their original and pristine state of conservation. Even if often unacknowledged, this basic observation is a well-known fact to scholars of Classical sculpture, and indeed it will be obvious to any modern museum...

Part I. Practices of Deposition and Reuse

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One. Metal Sculpture from Roman Britain: Scraps but Not Always Scrap

Ben Croxford

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pp. 25-46

Modes of thinking regarding physical states and perceptions of incomplete objects encountered during archaeological work are governed by modern Western structures of thought. Notions such as “broken,” “incomplete,” “damaged,” and “rubbish” frequently unconsciously, or at least in an unchallenged manner, dominate the narratives. This is particularly the case where art objects are...

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Two. Sculptural Deposition and Lime Kilns at Roman Villas in Italy and the Western Provinces in Late Antiquity

Beth Munro

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pp. 47-67

The presence of marble sculpture at Roman villas has been widely used by scholars to demonstrate the wealth, taste, and status of the owners of rural properties. As marble was costly and highly valued in the Roman period, the location of the sculptural finds has frequently highlighted the elaborate décor of villas, including in the dining rooms, courtyards, reception areas, and baths...

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Three. “Christ-Loving Antioch Became Desolate”: Sculpture, Earthquakes, and Late Antique Urban Life

Troels Myrup Kristensen

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pp. 68-90

Earthquakes of cataclysmic proportions feature with notorious frequency in both scholarly and popular accounts of the late antique decline and fall of cities in the eastern Mediterranean, not least because of their widespread occurrence in the contemporary textual sources, as well as the region’s more recent history of seismic disasters.1 The powerful image of earthquakes toppling temples...

Part II. Regional Perspectives

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Four. Old Habits Die Hard: A Group of Mythological Statuettes from Sagalassos and the Afterlife of Sculpture in Asia Minor

Ine Jacobs

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pp. 91-117

The statuary landscape of late antique cities in Asia Minor was largely derived from previous ages. A combination of Greek, Roman, and late antique statues, and especially their bases, survived into the seventh century or even later. In some instances, they appear to have been left untouched from the moment of their dedication. In others, statues were relocated to a new setting—often in the...

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Five. The Reuse of Ancient Sculpture in the Urban Spaces of Late Antique Athens

Nadin Burkhardt

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pp. 118-149

Statues were part of the visual appearance of an ancient town. Some monographs deal with late antique statues in Greece, but their context and secondary use are rarely taken into consideration.1 Assemblages of statues and other artworks constitute an important source for understanding the development of towns in late antique Greece. Statues offer a variety of insights into the modification...

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Six. Crosses, Noses, Walls, and Wells: Christianity and the Fate of Sculpture in Late Antique Corinth

Amelia R. Brown

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pp. 150-176

The sculpture collection of late antique Corinth numbered in the tens of thousands. Around the Forum of this re-Hellenized Roman colony, and in her temples, fountains, baths, stoas, houses, and roadways, once stood myriad carved and cast figures of greatly varying age and purpose. Provincial governors and local honorands lined roads, venerable cult statues were worshipped in...

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Seven. The Reuse of Funerary Statues in Late Antique Prestige Buildings at Ostia

Cristina Murer

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pp. 177-196

When discussing the original context of antique statues we must always take into account the important issue of mobility.1 The statues of Ostia Antica illustrate how complex the analysis of original contexts can be, both in regard to their specific conversions and their reuses. In some cases the transformation of the contexts can be connected to urban change. When these two factors...

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Eight. Germans, Christians, and Rituals of Closure: Agents of Cult Image Destruction in Roman Germany

Philip Kiernan

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pp. 197-222

Sculpted images played a major role in the construction of public space in the Roman world. Reliefs and statues adorned public buildings and spaces both in the centers of cities as well as on funerary monuments on their outskirts. Religious sites could incorporate both statues that were true “idols”—that is, objects that were the focus of religious activity and which temples were built...

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Nine. The Fate of Classical Statues in Late Antique and Byzantine Sicily: The Cases of Catania and Agrigento

Denis Sami

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pp. 223-242

Sicily’s geographical centrality and agricultural wealth made the island a key province first within the late Roman Empire and later in the Byzantine dominions.1 The wealth of Sicilian urban society in the Roman period is reflected by public monuments such as temples, theaters, amphitheaters, and fora documented in all the main urban centers2 that made these civic spaces busy...

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Ten. The Fate of Sculpture on the Lower Danube in Late Antiquity: Preliminary Observations

Cristina-Georgeta Alexandrescu

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pp. 243-262

From the first century BC onward, the territories along the Lower Danube became of great interest to the Roman Empire, starting with the northern part of the region (today’s historic region of Dobrudja, Romania), better known as Moesia inferior and, later, Scythia minor, meaning the area between the Danube and the Black Sea (fig. 1).1 Scythia minor continued to exist, under various...

Part III. Grand Narratives

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Eleven. Shifting Use of a Genre: A Comparison of Statuary Décor in Homes and Baths of the Late Roman West

Lea Stirling

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pp. 263-289

Two of the largest assemblages of statuary surviving from antiquity are found at the West Baths of Cherchel in Algeria and the late Roman villa of Chiragan in southwest France. These findspots reflect the fact that both baths and villas remained locales for the display of statuary in Late Antiquity, just as they had been in the high empire. Though the assemblages at Cherchel and Chiragan...

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Twelve. The Disappearing Imperial Statue: Toward a Social Approach

Benjamin Anderson

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pp. 290-309

The declining production of sculpture in the round during late antiquity can be traced both in the archaeological and in the literary record. Only rarely, however, can it be quantified. The best-studied subset of late antique sculptural production is the corpus of attested imperial statues. Already in 1982, a catalog of literary and epigraphic attestations of imperial statues from AD 364 to 609 was...

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Thirteen. The Sunset of 3D

Paolo Liverani

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pp. 310-329

Only in recent years have researchers begun to analyze a phenomenon that— precisely because of its macroscopic clarity—was considered too obvious to merit any consideration. I refer to the disappearance of three-dimensional sculpture.1 But what is at stake is a development that marks a cultural change of great historical and social importance and merits all the attention we can muster...

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Fourteen. Travelers’ Accounts of Roman Statuary in the Near East and North Africa: From Limbo and Destruction to Museum Heaven

Michael Greenhalgh

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pp. 330-348

Attitudes toward Roman statuary during the fourth to seventh centuries partly conditioned what survived into later centuries; but except for deeply buried material, it was later attitudes that, in all their variety, conditioned the small proportion of survivals that has come down to us, and that now fill our museums. Based on the accounts of travelers and scholars who visited Greece...

Contributors

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pp. 349-352

Bibliography

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pp. 353-412

Index

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pp. 413-424