Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Series Page

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Acknowledgements

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pp. vii-viii

First and foremost, our thanks go to the thousands of Indian residential school survivors and their families whose stories we had the privilege of listening to at the Truth and Reconciliation Commission national events. We also want to acknowledge the TRC commissioners and organizers who carried out the momentous task of implementing...

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Introduction. “The Body Is a Resonant Chamber”

Dylan Robinson, Keavy Martin

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pp. 1-20

At the 2013 Québec National Event hosted by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) on Indian residential schools, a Kanien’kehá:ka audience member summed up neatly the problem with the national project of reconciliation: “If you come and break the windows to my house,” he said, “you’re going to have to fix those windows...

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Chapter 1. Imaginary Spaces of Conciliation and Reconciliation: Art, Curation, and Healing

David Garneau

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pp. 21-42

The oil painting Aboriginal Curatorial Collective Meeting (2011) is an attempt to picture my memory of an event without violating the privacy of those who were there. The canvas is composed like a comicbook page. However, the panels do not show people or scenes and do not follow a conventional narrative sequence. They are arranged...

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Chapter 2. Intergenerational Sense, Intergenerational Responsibility

Dylan Robinson

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pp. 43-66

We come to know the world through our senses. Our early memories are full of colour, texture, hue, and smell: skinned knees against pavement, a breeze of sun-warmed grass, pitch-covered hands. Our childhood memories are suffused with the materiality of wonder and disappointment, as well as violence and shock. Because they exist...

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Chapter 3. this is what happens when we perform the memory of the land

Peter Morin

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pp. 67-92

This writing records the performance.
On April 27 and 28, I performed this is what happens when we perform the memory of the land. This performance happened in conjunction with the Truth and Reconciliation Commission event in Montreal (April 2013). As a performance artist and researcher, I experience...

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Chapter 4. Witnessing In Camera: Photographic Reflections on Truth and Reconciliation

Naomi Angel, Pauline Wakeham

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pp. 93-134

On June 1, 2008, as Prime Minister Stephen Harper offered an official apology to Indigenous peoples for the Government of Canada’s administration of the Indian residential school system, Shawn A-inchut Atleo, hereditary chief of the Ahousaht First Nation and former national chief of the Assembly of First Nations, sat with his grandmother...

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Chapter 5. “Aboriginal Principles of Witnessing” and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada

David Gaertner

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pp. 135-156

Witnessing and testimony are essential components of every truth and reconciliation commission,1 and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in Canada is no exception. However, these key terms are ideologically loaded and have historically excluded Indigenous knowledge systems (for instance, Delgamuukw v. British Columbia).2...

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Chapter 6. Polishing the Chain: Haudenosaunee Peacebuilding and Nation-Specific Frameworks of Redress

Jill Scott, Alana Fletcher

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pp. 157-180

In this chapter, we explore the potential for Indigenous and in particular nation-specific traditions and practices to enhance the current and emerging measures of reconciliation and redress1 for Indigenous people. There is already a significant body of scholarship on the shortcomings of official discourses of reconciliation...

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Chapter 7. Acts of Defiance in Indigenous Theatre: A Conversation with Lisa C. Ravensbergen

Dylan Robinson

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pp. 181-192

Dylan Robinson: Thanks for agreeing to do this interview, Lisa. I wonder if you might give readers a quick introduction to who you are, and say a little bit about what you do.
Lisa C. Ravensbergen: Well ... I am a tawny mix of Ojibwe/Swampy Cree and English/Irish, from Manitoba and Ontario. I have been a visitor...

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Chapter 8. “pain, pleasure, shame. Shame”: Masculine Embodiment, Kinship, and Indigenous Reterritorialization

Sam McKegney

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pp. 193-214

In October 2011, during a survivors’ sharing circle at the Atlantic National Event of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, a Cree woman recalled in eloquent and shattering testimony her forced separation from the younger brother for whom she had cared prior to residential school incarceration. Seeing her brother alone and despondent...

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Chapter 9. “Our Roots Go Much Deeper”: A Conversation with Armand Garnet Ruffo

Jonathan Dewar

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pp. 215-226

Jonathan Dewar: When did concepts of truth and/or reconciliation first strike you—as a person, and later as an artist, scholar, thinker, activist, and member of the community? When did you think about the need to uncover things that are unknown, hidden? When did you (if ever) have a concept of the need to reconcile, within a community...

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Chapter 10. “This Is the Beginning of a Major Healing Movement”: A Conversation with Georgina Lightning

Keavy Martin

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pp. 227-238

Keavy Martin: I was hoping that we could begin by hearing a bit about you—where you’re from and how you came to be a filmmaker.
Georgina Lightning: Sure. Well, I’m born and raised in Edmonton. My family’s from up north, in the Sawridge area. I was born and raised...

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Chapter 11. Resisting Containment: The Long Reach of Song at the Truth and Reconciliation Commission on Indian Residential Schools

Beverley Diamond

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pp. 239-266

I first heard about Indian residential schools when doing research in the Canadian North on Inuit drum dance songs for a doctoral dissertation in the 1970s. A number of families shared their distress about separation from their children and the loss of language rendering the younger generation unable to communicate with their grandparents...

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Chapter 12. Song, Participation, and Intimacy at Truth and Reconciliation Gatherings

Byron Dueck

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pp. 267-282

The Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s national event in Montreal, held in April 2013, opened and closed with song, as did each day of the gathering. On the afternoon of the first day, participants met around a sacred fire in a small park near the hotel where the rest of the events were to be held. Don Waboose, an Ojibwe singer, sang in the park...

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Chapter 13. Gesture of Reconciliation: The TRC Medicine Box as Communicative Thing

Elizabeth Kalbfleisch

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pp. 283-304

Words and actions, not things, drive the work of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.1 This is especially true of the public gatherings organized by the TRC between 2010 and 2015. In addition to meticulously collecting records and testimony from Indian residential school (IRS) survivors so as to amass a public historical record, part...

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Chapter 14. Imagining New Platforms for Public Engagement: A Conversation with Bracken Hanuse Corlett

Dylan Robinson

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pp. 305-320

Dylan Robinson: Hey, Bracken, can we start with a quick introduction for readers who might not be familiar with you and your work?
Bracken Hanuse Corlett: Sure. My name is Bracken Hanuse Corlett; I come from the Wuikinuxv, Klahoose, and Gwa’sala-’Nakwaxda’xw people. I’m based out of Vancouver and the Sunshine Coast...

Bibliography

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pp. 321-341

Discography

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p. 342

About the Contributors

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pp. 343-348

Copyright Acknowledgements

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pp. 349-350

Index

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pp. 351-375

Series Page

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p. 376