Cover

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Praise, Title Page, Series Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-x

Contents

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pp. xi-xii

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xiii-xvi

Collaboration rests at the heart of historical scholarship. Th is being the case, I would like to thank many people and institutions for their support in making this project possible. First and foremost, I owe a debt of gratitude to Bill Rowley, my doctoral adviser at the University of Nevada, who oversaw this...

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Introduction: Defining Hoptopia

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pp. 1-5

Among the fields and orchards of Oregon’s Willamette Valley grows a unique agricultural crop called hops. In this rural farming region, the climbing plant stands out for its vigorous vertical growth up high trellises and for the bright green cones that peek out from the plant’s leaves, top to...

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1. Wolf of the Willow

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pp. 6-18

Millions of years before American brewers opened the taps of the craft beer revolution, a climbing plant of the Cannabaceae family evolved in Asia. The hop, characterized by herbaceous bines, vigorous growth, and cylindrical green cones, made its home in river bottomlands and forest...

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2. Valley of the Willamette

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pp. 19-33

Long before the hop made its appearance on this planet, a small valley in western North America charted a history of its own. It was around thirty-five million to forty-five million years ago that volcanic forces and tectonic shift s crashed a seafloor into the emerging Cascade Range. Shallow...

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3. Hop Fever

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pp. 34-50

By the time Oregon achieved statehood in 1859, a few local breweries served the Pacific Northwest’s major towns and cities. The quality of beer varied, and beer-making establishments often came and went, not unlike many settlements in the boom-and-bust Far West. In Portland, a...

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4. Hop-Picking Time

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pp. 51-71

As the Willamette Valley gained respect, if not fame, as a global leader of hop production into the twentieth century, the annual harvest became a major event for the region. The three-week season brought a festiveness and culture unique to the specific crop, and for that reason piqued...

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5. Hop Center of the World

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pp. 72-92

in one of the early surprises of the Pacific Northwest hop industry, Ezra Meeker’s fortunes came crashing down in the late 1890s. Whereas many credited hop-aphid infestations as the culprit of his demise, the depression of the decade was to blame.1 Meeker’s millions earned from the wolf of...

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6. The Surprise of Prohibition

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pp. 93-111

While residents of the “Hop Center of the World” had been able to shrug off prohibition’s advance in the first decade of the twentieth century, the story quickly changed. In 1912, Oregon’s women achieved the right to vote via the state ballot-initiative process, and a majority supported the outlaw...

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7. Fiesta and Famine

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pp. 112-133

in the election year of 1932, “Happy Days Are Here Again,” a song composed by Milton Ager and Jack Yellen, blared from radios across the country as Franklin D. Roosevelt’s campaign anthem and the anthem of the repeal cause. In the midst of the Great Depression, the song optimistically declared...

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8. After the Hop Rush

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pp. 134-152

The Willamette Valley hop industry faced its greatest crisis in the mid–twentieth century. After an extended period of success for hop growers that included global praise and one of the state’s most vibrant folk occasions, downy mildew threatened to take it all away. While growers...

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9. Cascade

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pp. 153-172

Amid the vicissitudes of Willamette Valley hop agriculture in the mid–twentieth century, the research program at the Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station in Corvallis offered bedrock for growers to stand upon. State-sponsored studies on Humulus lupulus L. dated to the...

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10. Hop Wars

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pp. 173-188

At the same time that Al Haunold and his colleagues introduced new hop varieties to Pacific Northwest farmers, a revolution in beer swept the nation. The craft beer revolt against blander, mass-marketed lagers began during the 1960s and 1970s when a small band of rabble-rousers had their...

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Epilogue: Hoptopia in the Twenty-First Century

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pp. 189-196

In the new millennium, the craft brewing revolution continues apace. While big beer and its mass-produced lagers still control a significant majority of the market share per volume sold, craft beer’s appeal has reached all types of consumers.1 From coast to coast, small town to metropolis, newly...

Notes

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pp. 197-254

Bibliography

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pp. 255-282

Index

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pp. 283-306