Cover

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Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

List of Illustrations

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pp. ix-x

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xiv

At its publication date, this project is eleven years old. I use the term project with intention, because while its current state is a book, the book itself feels like a shoot of an underground rhizome that has pierced the soil and made it to light. The underground rhizome is the ever-growing, twisting and turning...

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Introduction: Spatially Extending the Digestive System

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pp. 1-19

In 1896, exactly a decade before William Keith Kellogg put his famous signature on the first Corn Flakes box, his older brother, Dr. John Harvey Kellogg, published a book called The Stomach: Its Disorders and How to Cure Them. In it he outlined his philosophy of nutritional health as...

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1. The Battle Creek Sanitarium: A Place of Health

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pp. 20-45

In June 1863, not yet a month after the official inauguration of the Seventh-day Adventist religious sect, God spoke to its visionary leader, Ellen G. White. While at a friend’s home in the southwestern Michigan town of Otsego, the “prophetess” lapsed into a dramatic trance, waking with a clear...

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2. Scientific Eating: Kellogg’s Philosophy of the Modern Stomach

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pp. 46-76

In 1896, during John Kellogg’s prime professional years as director of the Battle Creek Sanitarium, he published a book called The Stomach: Its Disorders and How to Cure Them. Although he published prolifically throughout most of his career, The Stomach stands out as the keystone...

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3. Flaked Cereal: The Moment of Invention

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pp. 77-101

This chapter is about the moment of invention of the first flaked cereal in 1894. This moment is important for two reasons, each the marker of profound changes in the relationship between people and food in Battle Creek, specifically, and in American culture more broadly. First, when the Kelloggs...

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4. Extending the Digestive System into the Urban Landscape

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pp. 102-123

Near the end of 1898, John Kellogg fi led an application for a sewer connection with the Battle Creek Board of Public Works. When approved and installed, the sewer line harnessed the quirky intestinal ecologies being produced at the sanitarium with the built environment of Battle Creek’s...

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5. The Systematization of Agriculture

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pp. 124-154

This chapter examines two intimately connected practices in the 1890s that were becoming enveloped into the analytical gaze of science in the United States: growing food and eating food. The application of chemistry and mechanization to fields, and the rise of private seed warehouses...

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6. Breakfast Cereal in the Twentieth Century

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pp. 155-171

The story of breakfast cereal changes dramatically after William Keith Kellogg—the younger brother of John Kellogg—gained control of the Sanitas Nut Food Company, which had been associated with the sanitarium from 1890 to 1908.2 There has been much to tell and retell about the...

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Epilogue

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pp. 172-174

Considering the rich association that John Kellogg maintained with the nineteenth-century health reform movement, including the rejection of pharmaceutical advances, it may be surprising that he remained committed to advancing his own practice through the use of chemical analysis...

Notes

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pp. 175-200

Bibliography

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pp. 201-214

Index

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pp. 215-226