Cover

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Title Page, Series Page, Copyright, Dedication, Epigraph

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pp. i-viii

Contents

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pp. ix-x

List of Illustrations

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pp. xi-xii

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Institutional Acronyms

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pp. xi-xiv

The French Indochina War presents an immediate dilemma for the scholar of historical memory: it is a “forgotten” war and yet has left indelible traces in the French imaginary. It has not captured public attention as have the German Occupation and the Algerian War; and while the Algerian War...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xv-xvii

Th is book has been a long time in the making and could not have come to fruition without the extensive support of many friends, family members, colleagues, and organizations. Norman Ingram’s patience as I muddled my way from a general interest in French historical memory to a focus on the Indochina...

Map of France

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p. xviii

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Introduction

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pp. 1-11

The French Indochina War presents an immediate dilemma for the scholar of historical memory: it is a “forgotten” war and yet has left indelible traces in the French imaginary. It has not captured public attention as have the German Occupation and the Algerian War; and while the Algerian War...

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1. French Indochina from Conquest to Commemoration

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pp. 12-33

In 1924 the governor general of Indochina, Martial Merlin, proclaimed that French Indochina “is increasingly active, its influence grows, and its role as a Second Metropole, an outpost of France in Asia [ . . . ] grows stronger.”1 This “Pearl of Empire,” as French Indochina was known, occupied...

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2. Remembrance and Rehabilitation: The ANAI and the Anticommunist Narrative

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pp. 34-53

Veterans’ organizations have long played a critical role in the commemoration of the wars in which their members fought, and in many cases in the maintenance and transmission of a particular narrative of those conflicts to the public. The First World War led to a new style and scope of...

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3. From Activism to Remembrance: The Anticolonial Narrative

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pp. 54-87

This description of the Indochina War from historian Charles Fourniau’s 1966 Vietnam at War illustrates several important themes of the anticolonial narrative: the emphasis on the colonial dimension of the conflict, its identification as a war of national liberation, and the characterization...

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4. Morts pour la France? Official Commemoration of the Indochina War

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pp. 88-115

On 7 June 1980, twenty-six years after the Geneva Accords, President Valéry Giscard d’Estaing honored an unknown soldier of the Indochina War in the main courtyard of the Invalides in the presence of some two thousand attendees. The ceremony, months in the making, had begun with the exhumation...

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5. “The Forgotten of Vietnam-sur-Lot”: Repatriate Camps as Sites of Colonial Memory

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pp. 116-144

In mid-April 1956 some 1,200 French so-called repatriates2 (rapatriés) from Indochina arrived at their new homes just outside of the small community of Sainte-Livrade-sur-Lot, in the southwestern department of the Lot-et-Garonne. Experiencing considerable disorientation and exhausted...

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6. “La sale affaire”: Collaboration, Resistance, and the Georges Boudarel Affair

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pp. 145-166

On 13 February 1991, just as he was about to present his paper at a conference on Vietnamese current affairs at the Senate in Paris, Professor Georges Boudarel was interrupted by a member of the audience who introduced himself as Jean-Jacques Beucler, a former prisoner of war and a government minister...

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7. Missing in Action: The Indochina War and French Film

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pp. 167-207

The release of three major motion pictures set in colonial Indochina—L’Amant (The Lover), Diên Biên Phu, and Indochine—in the first months of 1992 caught the attention of the French public and the media, who rushed to cover this cinematic “reconquest” of the former colony.2 The...

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Conclusion

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pp. 208-214

In 1994 Daniel Lindenberg wrote about France’s so-called memory wars and the way in which the French relationship with memory provoked “particularly violent controversies.”1 He opened by tracing the phenomenon back to the French Revolution, before shifting his focus to several critical periods of...

Notes

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pp. 215-276

Bibliography

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pp. 277-296

Index

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pp. 297-306