Cover

pdf iconDownload PDF
 

Half Title, Series Page, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 6-7

Contents

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. vii-viii

List of Illustrations

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. ix-x

read more

Foreword

Kim Hopper

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xi-xiv

This observation—by a social psychiatrist and a peer/service user with formidable voice-wrangling skills herself—may seem out of place in a volume self-described as clinical ethnography. After all, what’s explored in this work is the hard labor of managing psychosis; ...

read more

Acknowledgments

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. xv-xvi

We would like to express deep and abiding thanks to those who allowed us into their lives (some of the names that follow are pseudonyms) and who so generously shared their stories with us, and to the many institutions that allowed us to do research with their clients: John Hood, and those around him; ...

read more

Introduction

T. M. Luhrmann

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 1-26

Schizophrenia is and is not a thing in the world.1 To borrow a phrase from Steve Shapin, there is no such thing as schizophrenia, and this is its ethnography.2 There are few medical labels that have been so firmly rejected—and for some good reasons. There is no specific genetic marker for the illness. ...

read more

1. “I’m Schizophrenic!”: How Diagnosis Can Change Identity in the United States

T. M. Luhrmann

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 27-41

One of the challenges of living with schizophrenia in the United States is the clear identity conferred by the diagnostic label itself. To receive care in a society so acutely aware of individual rights is to receive an explicit diagnosis. A patient has the right to know. But the label “schizophrenia” is often toxic for those who acquire it. ...

read more

2. Diagnostic Neutrality in Psychiatric Treatment in North India

Amy June Sousa

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 42-55

In India, doctors deemphasize diagnoses and the biomedical specifics of what are essentially grave conditions, like schizophrenia. They don’t talk about diagnoses or treat diagnoses as important, at least when interacting with their patients. As a result, they leave many possible ways to imagine the future intact. ...

read more

3. Vulnerable Transitions in a World of Kin: In the Shadow of Good Wifeliness in North India

Jocelyn Marrow

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 56-70

Schizophrenia unfolds within a social world. What stresses a vulnerable individual, what matters as a symptom of illness, how the illness is understood, and who becomes responsible for treating it—all these matters are interpreted within community. In North India, that is the world of family and kin. ...

read more

4. Work and Respect in Chennai

Giulia Mazza

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 71-85

India is home to more than 60 percent of the slum dwellers in the world, but few of them are homeless, even when they stay on the street. Urban families without a place to live will settle into a square of city pavement with a kitchen area and sleeping place, and others will respect their space. Relatively few of those who are mentally ill live without their families. ...

read more

5. Racism and Immigration: An African-Caribbean Woman in London

Johanne Eliacin

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 86-98

Arguably the most important discovery in the recent social epidemiology of schizophrenia is that the illness does not occur at a fixed rate across the globe as researchers used to believe, but at variable rates. One of the best-documented cases is among the African-Caribbean community in Britain, where the risk for schizophrenia is as high as fifteen times the rate for the local white community. ...

read more

6. Voices That Are More Benign: The Experience of Auditory Hallucinations in Chennai

T. M. Luhrmann, R. Padmavati

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 99-112

Persons with schizophrenia and other serious psychotic disorders often experience a wide range of auditory events. We call them “voices,” but in fact, people also hear scratching, buzzing, and bangs. They hear voices inside their heads and voices that seem to come from outside, from the world. Sometimes the voices are clear, sometimes indistinct. ...

read more

7. Demonic Voices: One Man’s Experience of God, Witches, and Psychosis in Accra, Ghana

Damien Droney

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 113-126

In Ghana, many people accept that humans are able to hurt each other by supernatural means, and that human malevolence is the ultimate cause of death and illness—the reason that someone falls ill with malaria, say, at a particular time and in a particular way. This “idiom of distress,” to use Mark Nichter’s phrase, is so common in thinking about schizophrenia that in the Accra General Psychiatric Hospital, ...

read more

8. Madness Experienced as Faith: Temple Healing in North India

Anubha Sood

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 127-138

Spirit possession is what anthropologists call a common “idiom of distress” in India. That is, anthropologists have observed that spirit possession is a way of behaving that signals emotional distress. Both the person possessed and the people around her (usually, those thought to be vulnerable to spirit possession are women) recognize that the person possessed is suffering and needs intervention. ...

read more

9. Faith Interpreted as Madness: Religion, Poverty, and Psychiatry in the Life of a Romanian Woman

Jack R. Friedman

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 139-152

The Romanian Orthodox Church was once the primary source of care for those who lived with serious mental illness in Romania. Its centrality to the care of madness eroded first with the rise of scientific psychiatric asylums in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, and then by the total repression of the Church’s role in caring for the suffering under the Communist Party after World War II. ...

read more

10. The Culture of the Institutional Circuit in the United States

T. M. Luhrmann

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 153-166

To many people in our society who struggle with schizophrenia, we deliver care that is disgraceful. This is not, it should be said, the care that our health system in some sense “intends” to deliver. An analysis of care-as-usual for persons with schizophrenia concluded that “the rates at which patients’ treatment conformed to the [National Institute of Mental Health] recommendations were modest at best, ...

read more

11. Return to Baseline: A Woman with Acute-Onset, Non-affective Remitting Psychosis in Thailand

Julia Cassaniti

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 167-179

Psychiatrists and psychologists in the United States often think of schizophrenia as a lifelong illness with a downward, debilitating course. They have come to recognize that more people do better in the long term than this stereotype suggests. For most people in America who can be diagnosed with schizophrenia, the so-called positive symptoms of hallucinations and delusions often diminish around the age of forty or fifty. ...

read more

12. A Fragile Recovery in the United States

Neely A. L. Myers

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 180-196

Neely met Meg in 2006 while conducting ethnographic research in a public mental-health-treatment setting in an urban area of the United States. She wanted to understand how participating in mental health services shaped the everyday lives of the people who used them. The institution where she conducted research, here called the “Center,” ...

read more

Conclusion

Jocelyn Marrow, T. M. Luhrmann

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 197-222

Schizophrenia is the story of the way that poverty, violence, and being on the wrong side of power drive us mad.1 h e madness only emerges from a body vulnerable to experience it, from genes and pathways we do not yet entirely understand. ...

Notes

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 223-240

Bibliography

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 241-264

Contributors

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 265-268

Index

pdf iconDownload PDF

pp. 269-286