Cover

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Title Page, Copyright

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pp. i-iv

Contents

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pp. v-vi

Contributors

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pp. vii-viii

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Foreword

Oran B. Hesterman

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pp. ix-xviii

My first exposure to the sustainable food system movement happened in the early 1970s, when I was a student at the University of California, Santa Cruz. As a twenty-year-old sophomore, I was attracted to the Farm, an innovative project located on seventeen acres of rich, fertile soil and...

Preface

Sarah J. Morath

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p. xix

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Introduction

Sarah J. Morath

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pp. 1-4

Like any system, our food system consists of a complex web of players and processes. Our food system is influenced by farmers, consumers, businesses, and policy makers who produce, harvest, distribute, prepare, and dispose. Creating a sustainable food system will require an integrated approach...

I. The Elements of Our Complicated Food System: Food, Land, and Farmers

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1. Utopian Dream: A Farm Bill Linking Agriculture to Health

Marion Nestle

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pp. 7-14

In the fall of 2011, I taught a graduate food studies course at New York University devoted to the farm bill, a massive and massively opaque piece of legislation then passed most recently in 2008 and up for renewal in 2012 (it was subsequently passed in 2014). The farm bill supports farmers, of course, but...

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2. Land for Food in the Twenty-First Century

John Ikerd

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pp. 15-30

Ensuring access to enough farmland to meet the basic food needs of all will be a defining challenge of the twenty-first century. The sustainability of human life on earth, or at least human civilization as we know it, depends on the sustainability of global food production. Lester Brown of the Earth Policy...

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3. The Social Sustainability of Family Farms in Local Food Systems: Issues and Policy Questions

Jill K. Clark and Jeff S. Sharp

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pp. 31-48

Much of the focus of creating sustainable local food systems has been on establishing alternative markets and on rebuilding regional food system infrastructure; while this structural approach is important, it overlooks the noneconomic motivations and decisions individual farmers and...

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4. Achieving Social Sustainability of Food Systems for Long-Term Food Security

Molly D. Anderson

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pp. 49-66

Social sustainability receives less attention in the United States than environmental and economic sustainability, and its meaning is still ambiguous. It is frequently equated with social justice or equity, but what does this really mean? What kind of justice or equity? For whom? Achieved in what ways? At what...

II. Views from Within the Food System: the Farmer, the Consumer, and the Worker

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5. Community Agriculture and the Undoing of Industrial Culture

Josh Slotnick

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pp. 69-84

It’s early. The bustle has yet to begin here in the sit-down deli section of a giant gorgeous natural food grocery store in Missoula, Montana. In another hour or so, people across the age spectrum will fill the place, stuffing shopping carts, getting a Sunday morning coffee, or taking advantage of the lush breakfast...

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6. Consumer Access and Choice in Sustainable Food Systems

Jane Kolodinsky

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pp. 85-104

Consumers are an essential part of the structure of sustainable food systems (SFSs). Although SFSs have embedded values that are important to multiple cross sections of our society, in order to prosper, SFSs must meet consumer needs and demands by supplying everything from basic food security to high-end value-added...

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7. The Workers Who Feed Us: Poverty and Food Insecurity among U.S. Restaurant and Retail Workers

Saru Jayaraman

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pp. 105-122

Most Americans experience the food system as consumers—eating out at a local restaurant or shopping at their neighborhood grocery store. Besides being the only two consumer-facing segments of the food chain, the restaurant and food retail industries are also two of the largest and...

Part III. From Federal Policies to Local Programs: Solutions for a Sustainable Food System

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8. A Call for the Law of Food, Farming, and Sustainability

Susan A. Schneider

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pp. 125-136

American agricultural law and policy have evolved from an early focus on agricultural development and expansion to a current focus on economic and political support for discrete segments of the agricultural sector. This chapter calls for a new approach that can address the unique aspects of...

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9. Informational and Structural Changes for a Sustainable Food System

Jason J. Czarnezki

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pp. 137-168

The relationships between food systems, law, and the environment are strong.1 The ecological costs of modern industrial and large-scale food production are driven by greenhouse gas emissions, fertilizers and pesticides, and food miles,2 as well as agricultural law. Food choices contribute to...

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10. Breaking Our Chemical Addiction: A Twelve-Step Program for Getting Off the Pesticide Treadmill

Mary Jane Angelo

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pp. 169-188

Since the mid-twentieth century, the developed world, including the United States, has relied heavily on the use of synthetic chemical pesticides to support industrialized high-yield agriculture. Chemical pesticides, generally derived from fossil fuels, comprise a significant component of most industrialized...

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11. Turning Deficit into Democracy: The Value of Food Policy Audits in Assessing and Transforming Local Food Systems

Caitlin R. Marquis and Jill K. Clark

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pp. 189-204

The prevailing paradigm of food systems change has taken many forms over the years, from the back-to-the-land movement, to a focus on organic standards, and more recently, to the “vote with your fork” movement. One promising paradigm that has taken shape in recent years is the push for...

Index

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pp. 205-210