Half Title, Series Editors, Title Page, Copyright, Quotation

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pp. 1-6

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

List of Illustrations

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pp. ix-x

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Acknowledgments

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pp. xi-xiv

I am in the debt of many people whose labor, brilliance, and friendship have shaped this project. This book began in graduate school, where Ana Dopico was an inspiring teacher, a brilliant mentor, and a good friend. It was in her courses that I first encountered the critical histories of uneven development, dependency, and revolution that guide this book. ...

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Introduction: Latin America and the Meanings of “Underdevelopment” in the United States

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pp. 1-22

The danger of falling behind has haunted the United States at every stage of its existence: in a country that belongs so self-consciously to the future, the fight against national obsolescence is one of the enduring conflicts of U.S. cultural politics. Long before the emergence in the mid-twentieth century of the “third world” as a political category, many in the United States sought to distinguish their republic’s uniqueness in temporal and cultural terms from the nations around it. ...

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1. Latin America as Anachronism: The Cuban Campaign for Annexation and a Future Safe for Slavery, 1848–1856

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pp. 23-43

In Cincinnati in 1851, an Ohioan named William Bland penned a memoir of the last expedition of Narciso López, the Venezuelanborn, self-styled liberator of Cuba who twice tried and failed to forcibly annex the island to the United States. Bland’s sensational book, entitled The Awful Doom of the Traitor; or the Terrible Fate of the Deluded and Guilty, ...

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2. Latin America as Nature: U.S. Travel Writing and the Invention of Tropical Underdevelopment

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pp. 44-69

In the August 11, 1895, issue of the Los Angeles Times, S. Desmond Segur offered readers a study of “the pessimism that hovers, black-winged, over countless wretched little towns lying stagnant on the surface of our planet, and to one of which I propose to conduct my readers for the benefit of contrast,” with the United States, of course. ...

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3. Latin America at War: The Yellow Press from Mulberry Street to Cuba

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pp. 70-108

On July 3, 1898, as General William Shafter’s Fifth Army Corps massed outside Santiago de Cuba, the New York World gave its readers a detailed look at the eastern port city whose imminent capture by the United States would, all agreed, deal the final blow of the two-monthold war with Spain. The unattributed article, entitled “Santiago, Shafter’s Goal, Brought Home to New York,” attempted to educate American readers about the Cuban city by superimposing a map of Santiago de Cuba upon a plan of downtown Manhattan. ...

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4. Latin America and Bohemia: Latinophilia and the Revitalization of U.S. Culture

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pp. 109-142

In his 1931 best-seller Mexico: A Study of Two Americas, Stuart Chase asked the rhetorical question above about the subject of Robert Staughton Lynd and Hellen Merrell Lynd’s classic 1929 ethnography of Muncie, Indiana, Middletown: A Study in American Culture. Chase interpreted the Lynds’ discussion of class division, social mobility, and incipient consumerism in a Midwestern town as an indictment of a culture in decline. ...

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5. Latin America, in Solidarity: Havana Reads the Harlem Renaissance

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pp. 143-169

The next two chapters consider U.S. responses to Latin American radicalism in the cultural field—that is, in literature, film, and other forms of mass culture. These chapters examine the combination of yearning, curiosity, and fear that Latin American political movements held for those in the United States with few personal ties to Spanish America—that is, ...

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6. Latin America in Revolution: The Politics and Erotics of Latin American Insurgency

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pp. 170-200

After his famous 1957 encounter with Fidel Castro in a guerilla base in the Sierra Maestra mountains, the New York Times’ Latin America correspondent, Herbert Mathews, wrote a vivid description of the charismatic leader: “This was quite a man—a powerful six-footer, olive-skinned, full-faced, with a straggly beard.” ...

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Coda: The Places of the “Third World” in Contemporary U.S. Culture

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pp. 201-216

The places of this book’s writing have been of utmost importance for me. The local senses of a place, shaped as they sometimes imperceptibly are by the global and regional scales of uneven development and capital accumulation, have both shaped and sometimes undermined the national fantasies I have attempted to trace here. ...

Notes

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pp. 217-244

Bibliography

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pp. 245-270

Index

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pp. 271-284

Further Series Titles

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