Cover

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Half Title, Series Page, Title Page, Copyright

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Contents

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pp. v-vi

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Foreword: The Celebrity Nation

P. David Marshall

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pp. vii-x

Perhaps one of the most annoying habits that I have when watching a film or television program is to lean over to whoever has deigned to watch with me and whisper, “You know, she’s Canadian.” It might be a more recent incarnation of stardom and celebrity via Rachel McAdams or Ryan Gosling. Or maybe it is pulling a slightly older recall of fame from the likenesses of Jim Carrey, Pamela Anderson, or Ryan Reynolds; ...

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Acknowledgements

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pp. xi-xii

Editing a collection of essays is the art of coordinating moving pieces—lots of them. And so we owe a great debt of thanks to our nine contributors—the authors of those moving pieces—who embraced the process of assembling and revising this collection with the utmost in professional generosity. ...

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Introduction: Celebrity Cultures in Canada. It’s Not a Question

Katja Lee, Lorraine York

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pp. 1-18

According to her 2010 memoir, All of Me (co-written with Michael Posner), one of Anne Murray’s first and, she claims, very few experiences with hostile responses to her success and celebrity occurred during the filming of her first CBC special in her hometown of Springhill, Nova Scotia. ...

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1. Rediscovering Nell Shipman for Canadian Cultural Heritage

Amy Shore

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pp. 19-36

In the summer of 1977, film historians and movie buffs converged with locals in Priest Lake, Idaho, to memorialize silent film actress, screenwriter, director, and producer Nell Shipman. A jut of land overlooking Priest Lake was renamed “Nell Shipman Point” in honour of the woman who had come to this remote location more than fifty years earlier to produce the feature film The Grub-Stake (1923). ...

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2. “What an elastic nationality she possesses!” Transnational Celebrity Identities in the Late Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Centuries

Katja Lee

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pp. 37-56

In Canada we have a long history of having to move beyond our geopolitical borders and cultural institutions in order to produce and disseminate celebrity. Now, more than ever before, we are dependent on international and transnational cultural, financial, media, and corporate institutions to play some role in the production of celebrity culture, ...

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3. Terry Fox and Disabled Celebrity

Valerie J. Millar

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pp. 57-72

In 1977, at the age of nineteen years, a young man named Terry Fox was diagnosed with osteosarcoma and underwent the amputation of his right leg. In partnership with the Canadian Cancer Society, he began a run across the country, a “Marathon of Hope,” in 1980 to raise money for cancer research. After 143 days and 5,373 kilometres, Terry stopped because his cancer had spread to his lungs (“Facts”). ...

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4. Canadian Political Celebrity: From Trudeau to Trudeau

Jennifer Bell

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pp. 73-92

When Pierre Elliott Trudeau burst onto the Canadian political landscape, he brought an energy that revived and refreshed the country and electorate, inspiring both worship and vilification. From his candidacy for Liberal Party leader in 1968, to his multiple re-elections as prime minister, the media lavished attention on him, as did electrified and adoring crowds. ...

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5. Celebrity and the Cultivation of Indigenous Publics in Canada

Lorraine York

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pp. 93-110

She stands, smiling, looking directly at the camera, over a household tabletop rotary fan that has been placed on its back on the ground. She is dressed in a blonde wig and a white halter dress. The fan blows her dress into a bell shape, mimicking the iconic Hollywood image of Marilyn Monroe standing over the subway grate in The Seven Year Itch (1955). ...

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6. Lament for a Hockey Nation, Don Cherry, and the Apparatus of Canadian Celebrity

Julie Rak

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pp. 111-130

Although k.d. lang did not mention him at the 2013 Juno Awards ceremony, like lang, Don Cherry is one of Canada’s more unusual celebrities. As the star of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) Television’s segment Coach’s Corner, a vignette shown on Hockey Night in Canada every Saturday night since 1981, ...

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7. Bon Cop, Bad Cop: A Tale of Two Star Systems

Liz Czach

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pp. 131-146

Released in August 2006, the film Bon Cop, Bad Cop (Érik Canuel) has become a landmark in Canadian film history as one the highest-grossing films ever produced in the country.1 By the time the film won the Golden Reel Award for top box-office film, as well as the Best Picture statuette at the 2007 Genies, it had earned over CAN$12 million.2 ...

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8. Crossover Stars: Canadian Viewing Strategies and the Case of Callum Keith Rennie

Katherine Ann Roberts

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pp. 147-166

Several years ago I found myself teaching Canadian popular culture to a group of undergraduate students at an American university close to the 49th parallel. Despite the university’s proximity to Canada, the students’ knowledge of all things Canadian was more or less limited to the DIY TV spoof The Red Green Show (1991–2002) and Bob and Doug McKenzie’s “hoser” comedy Strange Brew (1983). ...

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9. What’s So Funny about Canadian Expats? The Comedian as Celebrity Export

Danielle J. Deveau

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pp. 167-184

There exists a pervasive popular belief that Canadians are funny, and that Canadian comedians have been, and continue to be, highly visible and influential in the US entertainment industries (Marin). Not surprisingly, this belief in the inherent funniness of Canadians is frequently reinforced by popular media and industry insiders, ...

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10. Re: Focusing (on) Celebrity: Canada’s Major Poetry Prizes

Owen Percy

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pp. 185-200

When the shortlist for the 2011 Governor General’s Awards in English-Language Poetry was announced in mid-October of that year, one of contemporary Canadian poetry’s more vocal provocateurs, Zachariah Wells, was quick to hit the blogosphere and the usual social media outlets to voice his outrage over its contents. ...

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11. Bureaucratic Celebrity

Ira Wagman

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pp. 201-218

This chapter contributes to a discussion about the production of celebrity in Canada by exploring the relationship between artists and bureaucrats. This is a difficult subject to broach. There are many institutions that oversee culture in this country at different levels. Sheryl Hamilton recently characterized the elements of the Canadian celebrity apparatus as “disparate, diverse, and disorganized,” ...

Bibliography

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pp. 219-240

Contributors

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pp. 241-244

Index

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pp. 245-251

Series Titles

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