Cover

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Half Title, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Acknowledgements

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pp. ix-x

The list of people I truly wish to thank is a lengthy one. In the limited space allotted here, let me recognize the individuals who were directly involved in bringing the present work to fruition, and a few others near to me who made it possible. ...

Note on Transliteration

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pp. xi-xii

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Introduction: Dostoevsky’s Types and Archetypes

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pp. 1-22

Dostoevsky indicated time and again that he was interested in creating character types—human types that were unique and individualized but endowed with a capacity to express and embody the whole of humanity. He would say of his second novella, The Double (1846), that its ill-fated protagonist, Mr. Golyadkin, mirrored by his double, Golyadkin Jr., “was a character of tremendous social significance, ...

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Chapter 1: Foundations of the Dostoevskian Self

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pp. 23-38

The iconic image of Dostoevsky is many-sided. In his own biography and as author, Dostoevsky inhabits the roles of oracular bard, revolutionary conspirator, Siberian-exile-turned-monarchist, philosopher of suffering and redemption, Russian mystic, and novelist-seer who predicted that Western socialism would be the cause of unlimited despotism in Russia ...

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Chapter 2: The Divided Self

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pp. 39-72

Throughout his public life, rumours abounded of Dostoevsky’s own “personality split” as the perception of him as a sick or mad/insane novelist grew, owing to his well-known medical condition of epilepsy and supported by his provocative journalism and political thought.1 Such, for example, are the attacks by contemporary critic Aleksandr Skabichevsky in two articles of February 1875 and January 1876. ...

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Chapter 3: Dostoevsky’s Underground

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pp. 73-98

Dostoevsky understood probably better than most what could make life so ugly and tragic, when one feels it ought to be delightful and exalting. Indeed, he recognized this awareness in his own art. He considered one of his greatest achievements to be the discovery of the “underground,” which had been overlooked by other Russian artists but became a literary trademark of sorts for Dostoevsky in his own lifetime: ...

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Chapter 4: Dostoevsky and the Shadow

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pp. 99-124

In the Introduction, I classify Dostoevsky as an artist who was interested in creating character types—in particular, types that express the whole yet remain uniquely individualized. He would say of the hero of his Jekyll-and-Hyde story The Double that, in spite of its critical failure, he had never created a more important type. ...

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Chapter 5: Myths of Transformation

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pp. 125-148

I argue in the previous chapter that the Karamazov brothers and a number of other characters exemplify Dostoevsky’s use of the shadow archetype to dramatize change and integration of the whole self. This particular dynamic becomes important as Dostoevsky sets the shadow against the distinctly other, higher, transcendent self, which I have been calling the authentic self. ...

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Conclusion: Dostoevsky beyond Duality

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pp. 149-154

Throughout this book I have endeavoured to show that, for all their conflicting variety, Dostoevsky’s major works converge on a compelling vision of personal transformation of the individual and give expression to that vision through archetypal narrative motifs. Frequently paradoxical, at turns unorthodox and heretical, Dostoevsky’s vision neither mandates nor guarantees this radical shift of awareness; ...

Notes

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pp. 155-184

Bibliography

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pp. 185-192

Index

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pp. 193-206