Cover

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Half Title, Title Page, Copyright, Dedication

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Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Introduction: Dwelling in the Dissolve

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pp. 1-14

The anthropocene is no time to set things straight. The recognition that human activity has altered the planet on the scale of a geological epoch muddles the commonsensical assumption that the world exists as a background for the human subject. New materialisms, insisting on the agency and significance of matter, maintain that even in the anthropocene, ...

Part I. Posthuman Pleasures

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pp. 15-16

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1. This Is about Pleasure: An Ethics of Inhabiting

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pp. 17-40

Gregory Caicco introduces the collection Architecture, Ethics, and the Personhood of Place with an excerpt from the Diné Hogan Song, which reads, in part: ...

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2. Eluding Capture: The Science, Culture, and Pleasure of “Queer” Animals

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pp. 41-62

Western, Euro-American thought has long waged “nature” and the “natural” against LGBTQ peoples, as well as women, people of color, the colonized, and indigenous peoples. Just as the pernicious histories of social Darwinism, colonialism, primitivism, and other forms of scientifically infused racism have incited indispensable critiques of the intermingling of “race” and “nature,”1 ...

Part II. Insurgent Exposure

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pp. 63-64

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3. The Naked Word: Spelling, Stripping, Lusting as Environmental Protest

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pp. 65-90

Although Judith Stacey was speaking metaphorically about the need for feminist theory to cast off its burdensome trappings, the start of the twenty-first century has seen feminists, environmentalists, animal rights activists, and peace activists who literally “dare to display more sensate flesh.” ...

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4. Climate Systems, Carbon-Heavy Masculinity, and Feminist Exposure

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pp. 91-108

The Gendering Climate Change and Sustainability conference poster features the stunning artwork of Kirsten Justesen, a Danish sculptor who uses her body as material. Ice Pedestal Formations #1 (now titled ice plinth #1)1 displays the naked artist standing on an ice pedestal, bent forward, gloved hands touching the ice by her feet, against a frozen background (Figure 6). ...

Part III. Strange Agencies in Anthropocene Seas

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pp. 109-110

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5. Oceanic Origins, Plastic Activism, and New Materialism at Sea

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pp. 111-142

Atomic testing. Dead zones. Oil “spills.” Industrial fishing, overfishing, trawling, long lines, shark finning, whaling. Bycatch, bykill, ghost nets. Deep sea mining and drilling. Cruise ship sewage. BP. Fukushima. Radio active, plastic, and microplastic pollution. Sonic pollution. Climate change. Ocean acidification. Ecosystem collapse. ...

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6. Your Shell on Acid: Material Immersion, Anthropocene Dissolves

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pp. 143-168

Who is the “anthro” of the “anthropocene”? In its ostensible universality, does the prefix suggest a subject position that anyone could inhabit? While the term “anthropocene” would seem to interpellate humans into a disorienting expanse of epochal species identity, some accounts of the anthropocene reinstall rather familiar versions of man. ...

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Conclusion: Thinking as the Stuff of the World

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pp. 169-188

Just a few lines from Jorie Graham’s poem “Sea Change” evoke anxiety about unpredictable futures that arrive too soon, in need of repair: ...

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Acknowledgments

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pp. 189-194

This book, even more than most, was catalyzed by other scholars, since nearly every chapter was sparked by an invitation to speak at an event or write for a collection. The much-revised chapters benefited from many people’s comments as well as ongoing scholarly conversations—face to face, at events, and through social media. ...

Notes

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pp. 195-236

Index

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pp. 237-242

About the Author

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