Title page, Frontispiece, Copyright, Dedication

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pp. i-vi

Contents

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pp. vii-viii

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Preface

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pp. ix-xviii

New Jersey is a small state in terms of area, but it has played a wide-ranging role in American history. As longtime teachers of and writers about New Jersey history, we are acutely aware of the challenges faced by individuals interested in researching and understanding New...

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1. Beginnings. Archaeology and Indians, the Long Journey

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pp. 1-30

Although New Jersey’s written history began five centuries ago when the first explorers visited the Atlantic seaboard, its Native American heritage stretches back roughly 13,000 years. For that early period, archaeology, oral traditions, and ethnohistory...

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2. The Colonial Period. Early New Jersey

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pp. 31-58

The diversity that has long characterized New Jersey’s population was clearly established during the colonial period. By the time the first Europeans explored the Atlantic coast, Indians had been present for approximately 13,000 years. In...

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3. The American Revolution and Confederation Period

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pp. 59-86

In 1763, New Jersey was small in territory and population (ninth among the original thirteen colonies), and overwhelmingly rural. The colony had no significant port and no newspaper, and its heterogeneous population was divided by section...

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4. New Jersey in the Early Republic

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pp. 87-114

Toward the end of June 1776, as New Jerseyans contemplated independence and a committee drafted their first constitution, Jonathan Dickinson Sergeant wrote to John Adams that the colony would soon be a “republic.” The end of the...

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5. The Jacksonian Era, 1820–1850

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pp. 115-144

Historians have labeled the period between 1820 and 1850 the Jacksonian Era, the Age of the Common Man, and the era of the Transportation Revolution, the Market Revolution, and the Communications Revolution. The title of Daniel...

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6. Civil War and Reconstruction

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pp. 145-174

The two fundamental events in U.S. history are the American Revolution, which established the nation, and the Civil War, which preserved it. New Jersey was a battleground in the first, but avoided the physical ravages of war during the second...

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7. Industrialization, Immigration, and Urbanization. The Post–Civil War Years

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pp. 175-206

The Civil War, which some believed would lead to the collapse of New Jersey’s industries, had the opposite effect. Cities, particularly Newark, Jersey City, Paterson, Passaic, and Camden, grew in importance, and manufactories, especially those...

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8. Immigration, the Progressive Era, and World War I

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pp. 207-236

The Statue of Liberty was dedicated on October 26, 1886. Though New Jersey and New York have sparred over its ownership, the symbolism is clear. It is an icon of freedom, liberty personified, welcoming new immigrants from abroad. And in...

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9. The Great Depression and World War II

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pp. 237-268

The Great Depression and World War II transformed New Jersey. The 1920s brought transportation improvements, a booming economy, suffrage for women, and the introduction of Prohibition. Then the Depression shook New Jersey’s political...

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10. Postwar New Jersey

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pp. 269-298

In Bruce Springsteen’s song “My Hometown,” we hear the plaintive lament of a father watching the decline of his hometown in the postwar period. The bleak view of shuttered stores and closed factories reflects the fate of many of New Jersey’s older...

Acknowledgments

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pp. 299-302

Index

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pp. 303-322

About the Authors

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pp. 323-324